How will NMFC Classification Changes Affect Your Cost?

The National Motor Freight Traffic Association considers quarterly updates to NMFC Classification.

The NMFC classification, according to the National Motor Freight Traffic Association, is a way of grouping different commodities that move in interstate, intrastate, and foreign commerce. The commodities are grouped into one of 18 classes, ranging from class 50 to class 500, based on four characteristics that determine how easily different commodities can be transported, or their “transportability.” Generally, products with a lower the class are denser and easier to ship. That translates to a lower freight rate. 

Each quarter, the National Motor Freight Transportation Association, which is made up of motor carriers, considers updates to the NMFC. The proposed changes then are voted on by the members of the Commodity Classification Standards Boards. The CCSB is made up of employees of the National Motor Freight Traffic Association. 

It is important to understand how the latest round of changes affect your freight. Doing so allows you to make adjustments and leverage these changes to your benefit to improve your transportation cost control.

NMFC Classifications

NMFC classifies commodities for transportation based on four characteristics: stowability, liability, handling and density.

Stowability: This considers how easily items will fit and/or can be transported with other items on a truck. For instance, hazardous materials generally cannot be transported with non-hazardous materials, making them less “stowable.” The same tends to hold true for items of unusual or oversized shapes. The lower the stowability of an item, generally, the higher its class and cost to ship.

Liability: This covers the likelihood a product may be stolen or damaged, or damage the freight around it while in transit. It also takes into account whether a product is perishable. The more a product faces these risks, generally, the greater the liability to the carrier, and the higher its class and cost.

Ease of HandlingThis covers multiple characteristics that affect how easily products can be loaded or unloaded, including their size, weight and fragility.

Density: As you might guess, this is calculated by measuring an item’s weight and dimensions. The higher the density, the lower the NMFC class and thus, the cost. While this may initially seem counter-intuitive, the calculation recognizes that denser items take up less room than less-dense items, when compared to their weight. That leaves more room on the truck for other shipments.

Updates to the NMFC Classification

In general, the changes this quarter take the density of shipments into account to a greater degree than they previously did. For instance, gloves and mittens, along with sealing and masking tape, are shifting from a single class to a density-based classification. This is similar to other NMFC classification changes that have occurred recently. 

This quarter, the changes cover about 20 NMFC Groups:  

  • Automobile parts
  • Building materials, miscellaneous
  • Building metalworks
  • Building woodwork
  • Chemicals
  • Clothing
  • Drawing instruments, optical goods, or scientific instruments
  • Electrical equipment
  • Furniture
  • Games or toys
  • Hardware
  • Iron or Steel
  • Machinery
  • Paper articles
  • Plastic or rubber articles, other than expanded
  • Tools or parts named
  • Bases, flagpole or sign, concrete, with or without metal attachments
  • Compounds, industrial process water treating, o/t toxic or corrosive materials
  • Forms, concrete retaining, sign or lamp post base, taper-sided, sheet steel 

In addition to these changes, a rule change under Item 110 clarifies that “coin- or currency-operated” refers to items that accept debit or credit cards, or other forms of payment, as well as cash payments. 

Working with Transportation Insight to Stay Abreast of Changes 

When your product ships, you will want to make sure the correct NMFC code is visible on the bill of lading, so the carrier knows to use it. It also helps to describe the product being shipped to the extent possible. 

Every year hundreds of shippers master their supply chain leveraging Transportation Insight’s ability to monitor the industry trends that affect transportation costs. To ensure our clients are using updated codes, Transportation Insight proactively checks all products against the NMFC database to help you manage the changes and control your spend. Our freight bill audit and payment solution provides an additional layer of support that ensures alignment between your billing and invoiced classification.

Do you have questions about how the fourth quarter NMFC classification changes affect your products? Contact a member of our team for a consultation.

For more analysis on freight capacity planning strategy, watch our Capacity Masters Roundtable. It offers guidance from our truckload, LTL and brokerage experts that will help you understand – and control! – cost drivers in the year ahead. 

Logistics Outsourcing? 4 Things Your Partner Needs

Depending on the logistics outsourcing approach that your business deploys, make sure your provider’s skillset aligns with your organization’s needs. 

In today’s environment, supply chain practices are taking central focus. Recovery will depend on adaptive response to global pandemic, economic turmoil and a sharp shift in buying practices and delivery needs. 

A lot of companies don’t have a complete understanding of what their partners should be providing. Outsourced solutions supplement your internal response to these dramatic shifts. When your partner exhibits these 4 Outsourcing Must-Haves they have the buy-in to keep you in the game.

Your partner can’t deliver? Better understand why.

Outsourcing Must-Have No. 1: Responsiveness

If you are not with a responsive partner that is able to enact change quickly within your supply chain, you are setting up yourself and your company for failure.

What does it mean to have a responsive partner? Your broker or 3PL should have a regular cadence for response. This is more than a quick, timely email follow-up when there is a problem – although that is important.

More than that, a responsive partner lends an empathetic ear to what is happening within your organization. That is fundamental to internal communications within the partner organizations, and it streamlines the ability to enact change that delivers value back to you – and your customer. 

A global pandemic validated the vital importance of having a responsive partner able to deliver value in the face of your individual disruption. 

Outsourcing Must-Have No. 2: Visibility

Not long ago, visibility was on the wish list. Today, it is a must-have for doing business.

Global supply chains have become so complex with the myriad of partners that exist around the world. Even if you only have a domestic North American supply chain, it is still quite complex.

Whether you outsource logistics, manufacturing or human resources, your partner should be able and willing to provide you with visibility to your data. It is valuable beyond belief. 

Accessing that data – as well as meaningful analysis of it – requires technology. You should have access and visibility to what is happening down to the SKU-level, in terms of historical trends in the shipping market with parcel, LTL, truckload and warehousing costs. 

If you are trying to make a decision on outsourcing part of your business, there is data that is going to help you with those decisions. If you do not have access to that data – or if you cannot get it quickly, you are with the wrong partner. 

Outsourcing Must-Have No. 3: Agility

Look back at the first half of 2020. How many supply chains were turned upside down? Right or wrong, so many risks for the future have emerged.

For example, what happens if, culturally, we decide not to continue doing business with China? What if a big portion of your market does not want to buy from a company that sources from China? 

With strategic alignment to your business and operational agility, your partner has the ability to anticipate market changes and provide a response plan that mitigates any emerging threats to your profitability. 

Whether achieved through their own technology stack or internal alignment, your partner needs to have the flexibility to adjust as your business changes.

Look at the retail world. In the early stages of COVID-19, every retail store closed apart from the essentials. That spurred panic for organizations still trying to figure out ways to sell products. It forced the traditional retail model further toward e-commerce. 

Companies that have really thought about their supply chain were able to begin using their retail footprint to fulfill from stores. Ship-from-store strategies kept inventory moving without requiring moves from distribution centers scattered throughout the country. 

That helped Levi Strauss expand its e-commerce business 25 percent during its second quarter, including a 79 percent uptick in May. About one-third of that online demand was fulfilled by stores. Doing that requires a massive change. If you do not have the internal resources of Levis, you need a partner that can support you. 

Outsourcing Must-Have No. 4: Expertise

Global networks are complex, Technology is changing rapidly. Your supply chain drives many moving parts across your business. A world-class partner should provide expertise in managing each of these dynamics – in addition to its core executable value. 

What does that mean? You need a partner that is delivering expertise around technology, process, innovation and their experiences in other industries.

A supply chain master that manages hundreds of supply chains across diverse verticals, service models and geographies has the ability to apply strategies that deliver optimal logistics performance across a broad variety of operational environments.

That broad experience means that when there’s a new technology, innovation, or process that might improve manufacturing, our supply chain leaders are looking for ways to apply best practices in retail or distribution arenas.

If you are in a monitored outsourcing model focused simply on tactical execution, expertise has limited value. 

However, if you are looking for a truly strategic, orchestrated relationship with a partner, expertise keeps your company moving forward in a disruption-filled marketplace.

What Sets Your Partner Apart?

If you have a responsive partner that is agile, flexible and able to deliver visibility and a deep bench of experience – hold on to it. These are prerequisite traits for a successful service relationship.

It also helps to know some of the traits that set a logistics provider apart in the marketplace. Three capabilities really elevate the performance of your entire supply chain. We detail these qualities during “The Logistics Dilemma: Insource vs Outsource.” 

Watch the webinar today. Hear real world scenarios where our clients have realized elevated value from:

  • Trust
  • Transparency
  • Strategic alignment

Your organization works every day to fulfill strategies focused on meeting the needs of your customers – and deliver additional value along the way. If your partner does not have alignment to and understand your strategy, how can you expect them to align and create more value for you?

Open the webinar and learn more about what sets a Supply Chain Master apart.

3 Outsourcing Models. Which is Right for You?

Digging deeper into outsourcing options, the situation gets a little more gray – especially in the complex supply chain and transportation management environment where so many aspects of your business can be affected by diverse nodes across your network.  

If you are reading this blog, you probably know what is involved with insourcing your supply chain management. Let’s explore three approaches to outsourcing. The model that best fits your business depends on your goals.

  1. Complete, Monitored Control

If complete in-house operational management is at one end of the spectrum, monitored outsourcing is on the opposite end. This is the throw-it-over-the-wall type of outsourcing.

That’s the original equipment manufacturer that says, “Hey, I need to make this widget. Here are the specs. This is how many we need. This is when we need them.”

You might examine activity once a quarter, once every six months, maybe only once a year. If something breaks, it is very hands-off.

A lot of times in logistics management, there’s not a lot of differentiation in that monitored outsourcing. A lot of times, it is going to cost a lot less and yield a lot less added value. In this scenario, you don’t have the management resources or the people you need it to manage a business function, so you put that completely on your service provider.

  1. Orchestrated Outsourcing 

With an insourcing environment, you have complete control, but you also face the most cost in the staffing of expertise, technology resources and all those strategic drivers in your supply chain performance.

In an orchestrated outsourcing approach you relinquish a measured amount of activity.

A lot of 3PL relationships today operate in an orchestrated model. You are relying on a 3PL, maybe it’s a broker that executes shipments, but you are still managing them. You have staff assigned to oversee their performance, track those shipments and make sure that 3PL is doing the things they need to do.

There is a lot more review, a lot more interaction, and of course, you are still driving that strategy piece.

  1. Hybrid Model 

You can often realize the most benefit through a hybrid approach. Here, you outsource key functions and access expertise-driven intelligence that supports ongoing improvement. You give up a measured amount of control, but develop a strategic trust that can help you determine service adjustments as business demands change.

In a hybrid approach, our logistics experts might be on site with you, right in there operating in your supply chain. As things change, minute-by-minute, hour-by-hour, day-by-day, as your partner, we are there ready to pivot our objectives as well.

This creates a strong strategic alignment, and it allows for a lot of trust and transparency. We operate as your logistics department, utilizing performance monitoring processes that help you hold our team more accountable for results. 

What Outsourcing Approach is Best for Your Business?

Understanding your company‘s internal people, process innovation, technology, and culture helps you decide whether to insource or pursue orchestrated, hybrid or monitored outsourcing.

You can start with one model and adjust with emerging change – in business strategy, human resources, marketing or supply chain disruption. The challenge is, as we saw in the first half of 2020, things are changing at a pace we have never experienced before. 

Having a strategic partnership in place can help you adjust the control you want to have. More importantly, in that close partnership you will always realize more value in responsive communications and rapid deployment of alternative supply chain strategies.

If you are deciding whether supply chain management is best insourced or outsourced for your business, watch our webinar, The Great Dilemma: Insource versus Outsource.  It shares four things your logistics partner must be able to deliver, as well as company traits you need to understand before making a decision.

Insource or Outsource Supply Chain? 4 Questions to Ask Yourself

If you are a growing company and are not already asking that question, you will soon – especially considering all the changes we’ve experienced in our economy recently. 

When weighing pros and cons of this important operational decision, start with a look in the mirror. Who are you as an organization?

You examine closely potential partners for any outsourcing relationship. You should pursue the same due diligence within your own organization. Knowing where your business stands in key areas can help you decide if the time is right to insource or outsource.

Here are four things you need to know about your organization – and any of your partners – to drive your insource/outsource decision. 

  1. Do We Have the Supply Chain Talent?People are the driver behind success. This is incredibly important in today’s supply chain environment. There’s so much change happening in the marketplace you have to stay on the cutting edge

    How do you stay on the cutting edge? Experienced people with tons of drive, in terms of learning and bringing innovative ideas to your organization.

    The supply chain talent gap is already big, and it is only going to get bigger. Companies are fighting for the top talent, and it is difficult competing against companies with unlimited budgets – Amazon, Apple, DHL or Transportation Insight.

    Are you confident that your company has the ability and the resources to attract and retain top-tier supply chain experts? As a mid-market or small market company, it is not going to be easy to get.

    And it’s not just the talent. What is your bench strength? Is your supply chain resource depth going to be able to rise to challenges and power your company’s disruption-filled environment? 

    The intelligence, and the experience that these people have is critical, but it also comes down to raw numbers. If you are a growing organization, maybe at one point, one person with the experience and intelligence necessary to do the job can effectively handle every step of your supply chain. 

    As you scale your business, you may need more than one person. In our webinar we talk about how possessing the agility to scale up your organization rapidly can make a big difference in the responsiveness you need to deliver on sales. 

    Other organizations experiencing their own growth face those same needs for people. That exacerbates the talent gap.
  2. Do We Innovate Processes by Nature?As you continue to scale your business to meet demand, are you confident that you have the processes in place to not only support that, but also innovate within those processes over time? Is that driven through KPIs? Or through the talent that you have?

    Many organizations are not set up to consistently advance innovation and measure that evolution. Companies like Amazon have process innovation inherent in their DNA, but not everyone has it at their core.

    The first half of 2020 has been a stark reminder: processes that were sufficient yesterday may not position you to compete tomorrow. To respond rapidly during a global economic disruption, a dynamic shift to e-commerce, or even a simple hiccup, it is necessary to evolve.

    As you do, collecting and monitoring data around process change determines whether you are heading in the right direction or toward more required adjustments.

  1. Do We Have the In-House Technology?The speed of change in technology is nearly impossible to keep up with unless that is your primary focus. Does your current technology platform support your supply chain management now? Will it continuously evolve with you as your customers’ demands change?

    You can build your technology stack, maintain it in-house, and join the race with the Joneses of the Technology World – SalesForce, Microsoft and Amazon. This generates a need for ongoing capital investment. 

    Unless you are a technology company, this might not be your area of expertise. One of those technology companies will sell you a base solution and customize it at added cost.

    Alternately, you can realize cost effective value working with a partner built on technology to suit your specific business needs. Be mindful of the cultural effects a new partnership might create. 

    Change management is a huge piece of the insource versus outsource conversation, but it can also allow you to redeploy current resources toward supporting your core competency. 
  2. Does this Fit Our Culture?Culturally, what does your organization look like? How do you make decisions? Is it a top-down, “You’re going to do what I tell you to do,” or a bottom-up, “Hey, I want ideas, bring the ideas.” 

    Are you seeking internal innovation or are you more focused on your core competency? Do you build or buy to solve challenges? What will our culture tolerate? What will it support? What does it really need?

    You have to be honest with yourself, and your company, and your partners. Having this perspective is imperative to the success of any relationship. 

    You could be the best company in certain spaces, but outsource certain things that you are not good at, culturally. To do that, you have to understand your organization. Even though Amazon is extremely good at what it does, it also recognizes the areas where it is not good. That drives focused Amazon investment into supply chain improvement opportunities.

    Understanding your culture will also help determine how you work with your partners, and whether your organization is in a position to realize success from an outside relationship. 

Master the Logistics Dilemma: Insource vs Outsource

People, process innovation, technology and culture. Before deciding whether to insource or outsource supply chain management, develop a clear understanding of these four aspects of your own organization. Keep them in mind when considering potential partners.

For more insight that can help you determine whether your company is better suited to insource or outsource logistics activities, watch our webinar in Transportation Insight’s Supply Chain Masters Digital Event Series. 

Open the webinar today for real world examples of companies evolving their supply chain strategy for growth. You will also get insight on the three types of strategic outsourcing approaches and four things that your logistics partner must be able to deliver.

7 Pitfalls Imperil Indirect Spend Management

Indirect Spend analysis requires different processes and technology knowledge from those of direct procurement. There are more stakeholders, segment complexities, and varying levels of expertise at the suppliers. Some items are commodities, and others are specialized for a business unit and rely upon a continually changing and improving set of technologies.

Efforts to improve Indirect Spend management relies on a complete understanding of the wide variability in factors that affect the cost of an item, the cost of procurement and issues that arise for vendor and buyer .

7 Variables Complicating Indirect Spend Management

  1. Low Average Spend: The product volume is generally on the smaller side because of the wide assortment of product and service categories and a large number of suppliers. In this case, the procurement group is unable to coerce better pricing or terms during negotiations with suppliers.
  2. Frequent low-volume purchases: Often, the frequency of purchases of small individual values, makes indirect sourcing difficult and resource-intensive.
  3. Maverick/Uncontrolled/ Non-negotiated Spend: Maverick Spend is the purchase of legitimate goods but using unauthorized buying arrangements or unapproved suppliers. Companies understand the value of robust management of direct spend, but may not recognize the benefits of managing Indirect Spend. The fact is that cost savings for indirect procurement does not originate from a specific bill of materials, as with direct procurement. Often, companies underestimate the Indirect Spend totals and the potential cost savings. Indirect Spend purchases usually are not covered by a contract negotiated in collaboration with a professional procurement group. Items purchased outside of an agreement could be a one-time purchase of office supplies, or travel expenditures, or expenditure on critical ad-hoc technical troubleshooting services. These costs add up over hundreds of items, categories, suppliers, and transactions.
  4. Driven More by Internal Stakeholders: Indirect procurement professionals may not have any mandate over an internal stakeholder’s budget. Unlike with direct spend, the procurement group has less say concerning Indirect Spend. Internal stakeholders hold on tightly to their approved budget and spending authority. Also, many of the expenditures require in-depth industry knowledge and experience to specify a product or service. These factors and this complexity make it more difficult for the procurement function to control indirect spending. The company’s procurement team must act as an internal advisor, influencing decision-makers about optimizing spend and getting more from suppliers.
  5. Hard to Evaluate: There exists hundreds of categories, adjacent categories, item suppliers and distributors, and each mandates an exceptional understanding to procure cost-effectively and also with an eye on long-term value to the company. Each of the tens of thousands of suppliers invests in a sales team assigned to each buyer. Motivation for those sales teams may not always be in the buyers’ best interest.
  6. Measuring Suppliers: It can be more challenging to measure the quality of indirect goods and services. There might be metrics for individual vendor performance, but there are few industry standards against which to benchmark those metrics. In some cases, delivery of indirect products and services is not in a company’s ERP system, so tracking contract renewal and evaluating vendors can be spotty. 
  7. Requires Diverse Experience: Purchases are as diverse as safety products, marketing software, maintenance items, and electricity supply. This breadth of categories requires a procurement group with expertise and a willingness to learn the full range of products and services.


Indirect Spend Management Requires Broad Capabilities

Organizations working to manage Indirect Spend must maintain a variety of skill sets within the operational areas tasked with overseeing these critical budget areas. 

Facing these diverse needs, companies are often challenged to maintain the level of expertise that a trusted procurement partner can often provide:

  • Professional purchasing experience or training
  • Broad category expertise
  • Project and change management
  • Influencing, engaging and advising budget-owners (stakeholders) across the company
  • Specification, facilitation, negotiation, and supplier management
  • Data analysis, creating business insight from raw data
  • Technological know-how
  • Recognizing supply risk from issues like constraints on industry capacity, regulation, or rapidly rising demand
  • Acknowledging the market’s preference for sustainability and the ability to cost-effectively comply
  • Understanding of current market conditions and market pricing trends

Strategic Sourcing Supports Procurement Decisions

Buyers are not all the same. Many procurement decisions have an economic buyer, the person who makes the money decision, and a needs buyer, the person with a job-to-be-done.

Guidance from a procurement group can help meet the requirements of both of these buyer-types. Proper specification of the product or service delivers what conforms to the need, while aggregating volumes and dutiful negotiations keep prices low.

By employing a Strategic Sourcing mindset, these procurement experts look across all activity to address planning, supplier qualification, item specifications, technology advances, training, support, outsourcing, contract negotiation and periodic contract review. Strategic Sourcing identifies the lowest total cost − not just the lowest purchase price. It embraces the procurement lifecycle, from specification to payment.

Strategic sourcing often creates a close, partner-like relationship with a supplier to meet the needs of all buyers, and in turn, improve service to end customers. For more information on employing a strategic sourcing mindset to control Indirect Spend costs through improved procurement practices, download Transportation Insight free guide, “Uncover Indirect Spend: Control Cost with Strategic Sourcing.”

Indirect Spend: Harvest Savings, Improve Competitive Advantage

Why does Indirect Spend matter?

A. Cost: Up to 40% of a company’s expenses might be Indirect Spend.
B. Savings: Optimizing procurement can save up to 25% on Indirect Spend line items.
C. Profit: Improving procurement strategies can deliver double-digit return to your bottom line.

Management of Indirect Spend is a big, challenging job, but the transformative effect on the business justifies the effort. Lower costs are one benefit. Rigorous specification, supplier qualification and strategic procurement processes can improve the products and services used by the company in ways that significantly improve the business.

Getting a strategic procurement effort on track requires persistence and a success-focused action plan. These concepts and tips will help you get started managing compliance, controls, and costs.

What is Indirect Spend?

Indirect spend items are purchases of goods and services not directly incorporated into the final product or service offering of a company.

Indirect Spend categories include Accounting, advertising, marketing, consulting, travel, IT, telecommunications, HR-Facilities, Utilities, MRO (maintenance repair and operations), capital goods, office supplies, furniture, food services and commodity packaging supplies. Indirect Spend in many of these categories can be critical to the company’s success.

Purchases justify a procurement group that can lower costs in the short-term and understands how supplier relationships can generate value for the company.

Gain Control & Harvest Savings

To reap savings from Indirect Spend, companies must strategically manage the processes and people involved. This management requires many collaborative efforts within a company and between suppliers, internal buyers, and your procurement team. Indirect Spend includes everyday items but also complex services. As your Indirect Spend management improves, your evaluation of suppliers becomes longer-term and more strategic.

To do a good job managing indirect spend, a business must commit to:

  • Executive sponsorship
  • Processes that identify, categorize and aggregate items
  • Systems that streamline and improve procurement
  • Support to select qualified suppliers and negotiate sound contracts
  • Collaboration between procurement professionals and departmental buyers
  • Monitoring for pricing, risk assessment, and changing market conditions
  • Measurements and visibility

You can see from this list how efforts to contain and control Indirect Spend are comprehensive and companywide.

Implement New Processes to Track Spend Better

Historically, companies put more focus on direct spend, which are the costs that go into finished products. Indirect spend categories can be more fragmented, numerous and diverse. Purchasing authority for Indirect Spend items is traditionally assigned to remote locations, business units, departments or internal stakeholders in a group, such as maintenance, operations, legal, HR or marketing. For these managers, relationships, proximity or speed counts more than cost savings.

Additional Tactics to Improve Indirect Spend:

  • Invest in Automation & Technology.
  • Partner, Hire or Train Procurement Professionals.
  • Involve departments in creating processes.
  • Get an optimal supplier portfolio.
  • Move toward long-term savings and value creation.

Get outside consulting if you need help to select technology, develop strategy, implement new procurement processes, pick qualified suppliers, or negotiate better, longer-term contracts. Transportation Insight offers free information and discussion about how to analyze your spend, put together a plan, assess the current situation, establish cost-saving processes, conduct strategic sourcing and save money.

Identify Items and Create Categories

A complex task is identifying Indirect Spend in your company in terms of items and costs. Reviewing payables (Accounts Payable) can offer the clearest listing of suppliers, items and costs. This review requires looking into spending by locations and departments to find the total for each item and the current supplier.

These steps can start bringing indirect expenditures under control:

  • Identify items and suppliers via Accounts Payable (AP).
  • Assign items to categories.
  • Review specifications and newer technologies, materials, or offerings.
  • Aggregate Indirect Spend item quantities into fewer, larger orders with preferred suppliers.
  • Implement company-wide contracts that reap volume discounts, favorable terms, and responsive suppliers.

Once you identify all the items, you can achieve success by aggregating similar items into categories that create larger bid packages for higher discounts. Also, there are opportunities for more substantial discounts, higher-volume deals open opportunities for supplier-managed inventories and multi-location ordering, replenishment, or delivery.

When items are aggregated and categorized, you may find opportunities to keep smaller quantities in stock, reduce the total number of items purchased, or reduce the number of supply closets.

Tasks, Goals & Metrics For Long-Term, Incremental Improvement

In the beginning, better control of Indirect Spend is different from the end game. After processes and suppliers are in place, the company needs to measure success and compliance. These measurement tasks need the right KPIs for suppliers and internal processes. Tasks, such as periodic budget reviews and training, are necessary. The company must build on success to reach higher towards the greater rewards from Strategic Sourcing and partner-like supplier relationships that offer an exceptional level of higher value.

  • Measure Cost Savings & Supplier Performance: Technology can provide real-time 
    visibility into purchase transactions to the line-item level, which helps to stay on track with ongoing spend management.
  • Set KPIs for Suppliers: KPIs can be used across suppliers, measuring contract compliance, customer satisfaction, cost competitiveness, service, support, and continuous improvement.
  • Review Budgets Regularly: Periodically review for savings opportunities under the revised procurement process. Ongoing cost review is part of a continual improvement effort. Also, look for ways to improve your new procurement process.
  • Create Lasting Value & Competitive Advantage: Ultimately, your procurement strategy should shift from the initial cost reduction phase to a value creation phase for the company.
  • Strategic Total Sourcing: Strategic Sourcing identifies the lowest total cost, not just the lowest purchase price. It embraces the procurement lifecycle, from specification to payment. Strategic sourcing is a procurement process that offers continual improvement of the purchasing activities of a company. Strategic sourcing often creates a close, partner-like relationship with a supplier to meet that customer’s needs better.
  • Educate Staff on Indirect Spend: Your procurement group (purchasing group) and budget owners from each department should become acquainted with the goals of your Indirect Spend cost-saving initiative.

Looking through these tasks, we recognize the importance of Indirect Spend management to the long-term profitability and competitiveness of the company. The efforts and organization-wide collaboration needed to attain results are apparent. Excellence in supplier management through Strategic Sourcing changes the basis of competition for a company and requires a continuing commitment to improvement in supplier evaluation, supplier relations and contracting.

Optimizing Indirect Spend Transforms Companies

By combining tactical procurement processes and strategic sourcing, companies realize savings in Indirect Spend that goes to the bottom line. As companies improve buying processes and view supplier relationships over the longer-term, the value of these relationships goes up along with the benefit to the company.

Businesses know that changes in technology, regulation, and markets alter the playing field for the company and that its ability to adapt to lower-cost and better-performing solutions is critical to success. For more information on reducing expenses by improving the management of Indirect Spend, watch our webinar, “Uncover Indirect Spend and Reclaim Lost Profit.”