Supply Chain Data Visibility to Plan, Adjust, Communicate

Shippers with good visibility into all aspects of their supply chain – including into suppliers for multiple tiers – can build resilience and agility to lessen the impact of disruptions like global pandemic, natural disaster or political upheaval. Supply chain data visibility, however, is just one piece of the puzzle. Your ability to act on that visibility is the key.

Drive Network Improvement with Data Visibility

Supply chain leaders around the globe are basing immediate action on real-time supply chain information – often captured through emerging supply chain technologies.

According to a recent Oxford Economics survey of 1,000 supply chain leaders, 49 percent – the top 12 percent of respondents – can capture real-time data insights and act on them immediately. Of those surveyed, 51 percent use Artificial Intelligence and predictive analytics to capture information. Although more than 75 percent of respondents recognize the importance of visibility into sustainability practices of their organization and suppliers, few have visibility into either.

While those leaders may realize new efficiencies in tactical execution, truly developing a strategic plan for procuring services and serving customers, requires more than a customized transportation management system.

Visibility End in Mind: Plan, Adjust, Communicate

You can know where to find the load, the inventory or the vendor, but you need technology, tools and talent to execute three steps integral to monetizing that information into cost savings or enterprise growth:

  1. Supply chain visibility is vital to initial network design, as well as contingency planning that may be required during an era of disruption.
  2. Supported by a contingency plan or evidence-based analysis, visibility empowers tactical operators and executive leadership to adjust their strategy to mitigate risk or seize an opportunity.
  3. Close the loop by communicating those adjustments to customers and supply chain partners, and enhance experiences while controlling costs across your supply chain.

Ultimately, visibility into your end-to-end supply chain helps you understand how to pull different levers across your network and increase the return on investment of the whole supply chain.

Real-Time Supply Chain Data vs. Real-Time Access

There’s a big difference in real-time data and real-time access, the latter can be far more valuable because allowing data to solidify can increase accuracy. The most important real-time data is track and trace. Although from the standpoint of being actionable, there is likely limited actions that can be taken to impact it other than communication.

There’s a balancing act between the information you have and the amount of lag time required for the information to be validated and integrated across the reporting. The length of time the data needs to “soak” depends how you intend to use it. You want to be able to correct performance before it gets out of hand, but at the same time you don’t want to make decisions based on incomplete data.

For instance, bidding on an LTL shipment in the TMS, you don’t want your financial reporting to reflect cost until the carrier has invoiced with any additional accessorials applied. Real-time access to your latest data gives you the power to identify trends so you can validate or eliminate services for improved cost control.

Mastering Data Visibility

Supply chain data visibility is accessible through business intelligence technology like Insight Fusion.

Deep, multi-layered visibility is a fundamental ingredient in elevating your supply chain to its optimal performance. Solutions for achieving that visibility are widely available, but none deliver greater supply chain mastery than Transportation Insight.

We build personalized solutions that give you visibility to rate savings, optimization opportunities and behavioral changes across the organization that reduce cost and can fund your initial start-up in the process. Executing in those areas, our team leverages transportation technology tools to improve the flow of data to drive ongoing process improvement that generates waste reduction, improves equipment utilization and protects profit margins.

Master visibility across your supply chain with our free resource “Mastering Your Supply Chain: Layers of Visibility.”  Download it today to access the information you need to improve service and achieve monetary savings.

7 FAQs Answered with Supply Chain Visibility

“They have better visibility into the structure of their supply chains. Instead of scrambling at the last minute, they have a lot of information at their fingertips within minutes of a potential disruption. They know exactly which suppliers, sites, parts and products are at risk, which allows them to put themselves first in line to secure constrained inventory and capacity at alternate sites,” concludes Arizona State University professor of supply chain management Thomas Y. Choi.

Peeling into the physical layers (where is my shipment?) and virtual layers (which customer/SKU combinations are profitable?) of supply chain visibility, business leaders can uncover data evidence to drive network decision-making. Combined, information gathered through both layers of visibility answers questions that improve cost control and service to customers.

Where and when?

At its most basic, supply chain visibility gives you physical location of a product in the supply chain. This can include where an inbound shipment is, where you have inventory, or when a shipment will arrive at a customer. When you have this type of visibility, you can make decisions around production scheduling, facility/customer alignment and proactive communication to customers for delivery expectations. Visibility allows the awareness needed to provide the highest level of customer service while maintaining cost control.

Where are the suppliers?

Understanding your suppliers’ geographic location is critical not only to executing a robust network design but also in mitigating risk. Understanding the production and shipping locations of your suppliers during a period of disruption allows you to execute contingency plans developed during modeling exercises.

For instance, when an overseas disruption affects a foreign supplier, maintaining a geographical awareness of primary supply chain partners is vital. Combine location information with advanced understanding of alternative sources and you can facilitate a rapid crisis response that protects customer experience and prevents other breaks in the supply chain.

Where are the customers?

Your customers and their demand drives everything about your supply chain. From the locations of your distribution centers to the shipping options available to meet customer service requirements, having a detailed understanding of the concentration of demand means you can work backwards to develop efficient and reliable options to keep them happy.

Take for example an emerging market in a different region of the country. Customer expectations for delivery are very high. Not providing a high level of service is not an option. Options exist to leverage expedited freight but may make the price point too high or erode the margin on the product. A partner warehouse may be a good option to position inventory to meet service levels without investing in owned brick and mortar.

Where is the inventory?

Your physical assets connect the vendor and customer locations. These assets allow you to position inventory to mitigate risk while providing the service customers expect. Having complete visibility to where and how much inventory you have is critical to making smart sourcing decisions:

  • From which location can I fulfill the order?
  • Is it cheaper to consolidate or split the order?
  • Can I drop ship?

Understanding all of the inventory options available enables you to leverage your vast web of connections throughout your supply and customer base to delight your customers.

Can I access all my data?

Your supply chain generates a tremendous amount of data. Accessing all of it is not easy, especially when you are working across multiple vendors, customer segments, product categories or transportation modes. Consolidating your information across disparate systems and sources is the first step toward gleaning actionable improvement opportunities from your supply chain data. The more access to information you have, the more it can impact your bottom line.

An expert partner with significant technology capabilities can compile disparate data in an accessible repository and provide it in personalized dashboards, as well as apply experience-inspired analysis. Accessing that analysis in the same platform as operational data and tactical execution activities is critical to supporting quick, evidence-based decision-making.

What is cost to serve?

For each product and customer, executive leadership needs to understand cost to serve, which reflects all the activities and costs incurred as movement and conversation occurs from vendors through your network out to the customer. Cost to serve metrics provide actionable information by enabling visibility into the profitability of individual customers and products, and finding a fulfillment configuration that balances service and margin.

By utilizing actionable data derived from historical shipment information and running what-if scenarios with regional data and characteristics, you can develop the most responsive and efficient supply chain that meets customer demand for the best cost.

Why is my cost going up/down?

Leveraging robust score cards can provide insight into the factors that are driving your financial performance. Not all drivers are completely controllable. You cannot make your customer order from a different location or change what they want to buy. There is an old adage “you cannot change how other people act, only how you react to them.” The same holds true for the supply chain.  Develop plans to react to supplier performance and customer behavior to set up your company for success.

It is absolutely critical to have an unbiased party developing and interpreting the scorecards and information produced. You want objective viewpoints that highlight all options available to contend with dynamics in the marketplace. Not only do you want a view into your data but also what is going on within the market. In the new environment, it is more critical than ever to leverage every bit of available information across the marketplace.

Combine Layers for Master Vision

Physical visibility to shipment, service and costs can be accessed through very basic solutions that exist in the marketplace, some at low or no initial cost. Customization often requires additional investment, and visibility is black and white based on data made available by vendors, clients or carriers. A basic Transportation Management System provides tactical visibility to all of the connections in the supply chain, and it can enable cost savings.

Virtual visibility to all the activities that drive cost, service and reliability allows you to delve into the “what” and “why” around supply chain performance systematically and regularly. This requires investment in people, process and technology. The return on that investment: an enhanced ability to react to supply chain changes that impact performance. You also improve service to partners and customers.

Visibility does not just happen, and it is not free. Corporate alignment from the top down is required to achieve a complete solution. You want knowledgeable resources with broad experience to help guide you.

We created Mastering Your Supply Chain: Layers of Visibility to give you greater clarity into your end-to-end network. Read it today and uncover information you need to drive competitive advantage.

The Relativity of the Supply Web


This fundamental truth applies to many aspects of our lives, including how we run our business. It’s a question that logistics managers and technology teams will have to consider when they think about their transformation from a single-direction supply chain to a multi-direction supply web. Does your team have the time to build out a technology suite of value? Or does partnership allow us to save time to focus on what’s best, and drive long-lasting change.

It may come as no surprise that the time you save through partnership may be the most valuable investment of all.

Technology: The Core of Supply Web Change

For manufacturers and distributors, the question on transforming into the supply web comes down to technology. If your current systems don’t provide a deep look into how your supply chain operates, then you could be losing out on data that could provide insight and identify opportunities.

Your team isn’t the only ones struggling with these questions. A recent Gartner survey identified the overwhelming majority of supply chain executives said digital business software and advanced analytics/big data is key to their future business plan, making them a top priority for the remainder of 2020 and beyond.

While this is one of the top priorities for supply chain leaders in the future, the problem lies in building the solution. Creating a custom, in-house solution requires dedicated time and resources from your supply chain, shipping, and technology teams. Taking them away from their tasks means lost man-hours in fulfilling customer demands, which can result in an immediate loss your team cannot recuperate because the time to serve them is gone.

Meanwhile, customers expect their providers to have the technology to identify the most efficient and expedited processes to fulfill orders. If you don’t have that capability, they will go to the next source that does. Can you afford to lose orders because of a lack of supply chain transparency?

Finding Agility and Transparency Through Partnership

Agility in the supply chain is all about being able to react quickly to customer behaviors. Because e-commerce and direct ordering increases are part of our “new normal,” customers demand their packages get to their destinations faster and with full transparency.

There are two ways to achieve this audience demand. The first way is to work with partners who already have the supply chain technology you need to succeed leading to being a better partner to your component and supply chain partners through data sharing and expectation setting.

Your company is already good at providing your core products and services to your audience. Time and money should not be spent building systems that already exist – they should be spent serving your customers and helping them succeed. This is why you need an analytics and business intelligence partner who understands your business, and has both the technology and know-how across supply chains to develop the data and options you need to execute.

This is where a partner like Transportation Insight comes into play. With proven tools that give you the supply chain transparency you need to transition into a supply web, your team can get access to big data analytics and business intelligence tools sooner rather than later. This gives you end-to-end transparency which can help you identify new synergies within your web, including fewer internal touches before shipping, and the potential to drop-ship directly from suppliers.

With this information, your team can be a better partner to your domestic and foreign suppliers. With sales information, time-in-shipping data, and other key performance indicators, you can help predict when you will need to reorder supplies, track trends which can help drive production guidelines, and ultimately create a workflow that keeps your shelves stocked with the right items, and customers happy with the efficiencies of their orders.

Tying It All Together

As the supply chain transforms into the supply web, driving a durable information network will give you the agility and intelligence you need to meet your customer demands. By utilizing a partner to tie it all together, your team can get the insight and transparency you need to make the best decisions for business.

Now and into the future, Transportation Insight is here to help your business grow at the speed of commerce. Schedule a consultation today to learn how we have the tools and skills needed to save time and save money.

Disruption – Not Necessity – Is the Mother of Supply Chain Improvement

However, the novel Coronavirus outbreak created major supply chain disruption which affects all companies and industries. In the interest of safety, a whole new set of rules govern how we do business. Some of those trends coming out of this include:

  • Rules on social distancing, mandating how many people can be in a space at a given time.
  • Truck and delivery driver safety suggestions for transporting goods from the warehouse to the end customer.
  • A spike in e-commerce orders and home deliveries across industries, including grocery and consumer packaged goods.

These changes have one thing in common: They all rely on a strong and resilient supply chain. Without a constant flow of inbound components and finished goods, they can’t go from origin to the warehouse, and then outbound to the end customer.

This is why it’s critical to master your supply chain now. Understanding where components come in, measuring key performance indicators, and cutting out waste is the only way companies can get the insight they need to drive future invention from supply chain disruption.

Excelling During a Period of Infrastructure-Led Disruption

When the novel Coronavirus began spreading in the United States, we saw a lot of supply chain disruption. The truth is we may not be done. A recent Gartner analysis suggests we could see three different scenarios play out as the country re-opens for business: a short-term disruption leading to a quick recovery, a long-term disruption leading to protracted recovery, or a resurgence of COVID-19 cases leading to one of the two other scenarios.

Because we don’t know which recovery to expect, your supply chain leaders need to understand infrastructure and operations weaknesses and opportunities now. There are many different ways to do this, including supply chain mapping and modeling, identifying new supply partners closer to your facility, and identifying the best transportation networks to achieve your customer service goals.

So why invest in technology and analytics today? Historically speaking, companies who invest in their processes and people during disruption experience a faster recovery than those who don’t. More importantly, a disruption allows you to view your operational plans candidly and determine how the combination of leadership and talent, technology, business mission and values, and process framework can improve your supply chain.

As we see from the Gartner figure above, infrastructure-led disruption can directly lead to new innovations within your supply chain and network plans, but only to the extent your talent drives them. Thus, disruption – not necessity – is truly the mother of invention.

Where Do We Start Driving Infrastructure-Led Disruption?

The first step to creating long-lasting change starts inside your company. Now is the perfect time to start having those conversations because leadership teams were talking about making lasting change well before COVID-19 became part of the common vernacular.

2019 survey of boards of directors by Gartner revealed those leaders anticipated a complete transformations of their infrastructure and operations by 2025, with the core goals being improving maturity, driving quality and creating more agile supply chains. The current situation gives leadership teams two options: either attempt to improve within the legacy framework, or use infrastructure-led disruption as an impetus to improve operations.

Trying to improve a legacy model may not work for several reasons. If you can’t answer these questions, any attempt to repair a broken system could create more problems:

Going through a supply network analysis will not only answer these three questions, but give you the analytics you need to make better customer-focused decisions. By going through the exercise and continually improving infrastructure and operations through regular analysis, your team can drive true cost savings and customer experience improvement, leading to improved service and earning more orders over time.

Start Your Infrastructure-Led Disruption Today

Your leaders don’t need to approach infrastructure-led disruption on their own. Transportation Insight has the tools and technology your team needs to drive innovation, combined with the insight into thousands of supply chains across industries. With our expertise, our teams can help you understand where your supply chain is falling short, and where you can drive improvement both through disruption and into recovery.

Our team works through the lens of your business perspective, helping you unlock value from your supply chain and creating efficiencies into the future. Contact us today, and let us help you use disruption a tool to drive long-lasting success.

How E-Commerce is Driving the Supply Web Evolution

Many aspects of our life may be changed forever. Air travel shut down virtually overnight, with no indication on when we can fly to see friends and loved ones across the country. It’s not uncommon to see retail store shelves barren of the cleaning items we take for granted, leaving some to seek these necessities through less-traditional channels. Additionally, when shoppers do visit mega-stores, their carts are usually filled with groceries instead of household items, appliances and clothing.

Will isolation and social distancing cause a permanent change in shopping behavior? Will e-commerce become the new way Americans get their vital needs? A shift in consumer trends could have serious implications for retailers, their entire supply network and the overarching logistics strategies applied around the planet.

Why do companies need to pay attention to the spike in e-commerce orders?

With federal and state guidelines suggesting that everyone stay at home, online shopping increased in popularity. The online demand is so significant that Amazon is conditioning customers to not shop excessively on its platform. Meanwhile, e-tailers are overwhelmed with requests. We’re also seeing this trend among our customers as well. One customer – a chain of home improvement stores – recently asked for our help managing a skyrocketing e-commerce business that required an adjustment in their freight and parcel strategy.

The end consumer may see nothing wrong with this change. Online shopping is more convenient, requires less effort, and happens either over the phone or online. But for retailers and distributors, a growing e-commerce demand creates many issues on the back end.

While the growth of e-commerce has been the big story over the past decade, it still represents less than 20 percent of all retail sales overall. If that volume doubles, could your business sustainably make money?

Our research tells us that the largest companies are spending more time focusing on e-commerce profitability. Direct order fulfillment costs can easily exceed 25 percent of sales, which creates a precarious balance for companies offering direct-to-consumer service. Slim profit margins in brick-and-mortar retail add complexity. In the best situations, in-store sales only yields a profit margin of three percent.

If your e-commerce channels aren’t optimized for success, growing the channel is expensive at best, and unsustainable at its worst.

An inconvenient truth: environmental concerns from e-commerce

Another issue to consider is the environmental impact of online shopping. Fulfilling digital orders requires additional resources, including packing materials, corrugated boxes, additional fulfillment centers and waste handling. On top of that are emissions from trucks making last-mile deliveries and returns to homes across the United States.

All of the packaging and air pollutants have to go somewhere. While corrugated boxes and most packaging can be recycled, there’s never a full recovery of those materials. Although emissions can be reduced, we’re a long way from net-zero emissions globally.

These two challenges illustrate why the supply chain needs to change. We are no longer in a world where the supply network is one straight line from source to consumer. Instead, retailers and distributors need to work together to discover new ways to manage commerce through a supply web.

E-commerce as a catalyst to the supply web

As our world looks to e-commerce as a potentially permanent shopping solution, now is the time to start the transformation from a supply chain to a supply web. There are many different reasons why the supply web provides better solutions for both your company, distribution points and end consumers.

A supply chain suggests freight moves in one direction: from the source to the distribution center and then out to the retailer or customer. However, this model may create several unnecessary steps. For instance: if a customer makes an online order, the supply chain implies the product goes from its source point to the consumer. Under a supply web model, the order can go from the retailer or manufacturer to the closest distributor for fulfillment. The customer gets their order faster from the closest point, without the need for excessive shipping or re-packaging.

One of our clients in the construction industry recently transformed their supply chain into a web model. Instead of taking everything in at one center and re-distributing through smaller fulfillment centers, freight began moving from overseas into two different distribution centers that fed other centers in their network. This gain in shipping efficiency ensured customers could get orders in days instead of weeks.

Measuring the efficiency of the supply web is critical to success. Transportation Insight has tools which enable your e-commerce team to understand key performance indicators and drive success. Our margin management tool enables shippers to determine profitability by both dimension and SKU. It quickly identifies cost-killing areas of your e-commerce offering such as SKUs that drive split-package orders, excessive freight expense, high cube, high service expense or long zones.

The second key tool available through Transportation Insight is our supply chain and value stream mapping expertise. We develop a graphical representation of where your items, information and finances are coming from and going to. By mapping out your flows in this manner, we identify gaps and risks that can be mitigated through actionable plans and network optimization.

The significant profitability and sustainability challenges of e-commerce fulfillment are here to stay. By transitioning to a supply web model, your company can not only find better routes to profitability online, but also drive long-term, sustainable results.

Service Merchandise omnichannel fulfillment

Master Omnichannel Fulfillment, Enhance Experience

Retail has changed a lot in nearly four decades since Service Merchandise – and its catalog – was familiar in households across North America. Still, many of the retailers’ leading-edge concepts are just as applicable in an e-commerce age that requires customer service capabilities across multiple channels.

Let’s look at some supply chain practices that can support an omnichannel service that enhances the experience of your customers – whether they are shopping in-store, online at their desktop on their smartphone or by telephone.

Can You Compete with Amazon? Should you Try?

Most retailers are still trying to figure out the right recipe for omnichannel. Revisiting the strategies that anchored the success of Service Merchandise, alongside modern supply chain best practices can help retailers focused on managing fulfillment costs and expanding growth across all sales venues.

Companies have to decide where they want to play. With more service comes more cost. You have to understand your customer base and understand who you want to compete against. Can you compete against Amazon at a national level? Maybe not, and if you try you may bankrupt yourself.

With customers’ rising expectations for free shipping and 2- or 3-day delivery, retailers need to be able to design a distribution network where every customer in the U.S. can be reached within two days.

For companies that have brick and mortar locations, the question becomes: How do you leverage all inventory assets to decrease customer lead time – and do it cost effectively?

That requires analysis, good data, good tools and people who know how to interpret that information.

A 21st Century Hurdle

One obstacle facing today’s retailers that Service Merchandise didn’t have to deal with: massive SKU proliferation. While the retailer probably carried a significant number of SKUs in its backroom, it also knew that most of its customers were not walking in the door with the goal of buying 10+ items.

This didn’t pose a problem until the definition of “convenience” changed. The world’s super centers caught onto the shift and started carrying dozens of different “similar” items – all on the sales floor.

At that point, all that a shopper had to do was walk in, fill a cart, and walk out the door.

In today’s landscape, if you are competing against retail and e-tail giants, it is critical to understand the profit performance of each product you offer, particularly in light of any associated fulfillment and delivery costs.

Model Networks to Manage Mistakes

Modelling exercises help retailers determine cost trade-offs versus service before you start an initiative. This can allow you to determine where to guarantee 2-day delivery in certain areas, while offering longer service time and lower cost in other areas.

One of the core benefits of network modelling: you can do all the what-if scenarios so you know how the network reacts before you invest dollars and make a mistake.

Data-driven network modelling is also an asset when disruption threatens the order-to-cash cycle. This type of proactive modelling allows a shipper to identify response options before disaster occurs and jeopardizes successful final delivery.

Leverage the Right Resources

Most retailers may not have resources to manage massive amounts of data and then turn around to review and reproduce network designs every six months or faster – all while managing a separate returns network and a separate dot-com network.

Many organizations cannot afford to obtain the people, obtain the tools and manage to keep them. If you do have a staff on site, those people may not always be needed for network design or analysis. You end up re-tasking them with other things so they are not staying fresh on their modelling skills, and when it is time to update the model – what if they are working on other critical projects? That work falls by the wayside.

Another downside of an internal modelling team: They get to know your business, and how it works. There’s a tendency to get into a modelling rut, modelling within your constraints rather than challenging “sacred cows”.

Someone outside your organization knows what other companies have done, what works and what doesn’t, – and they’re not limited by your constraints. That’s why consulting companies exist. They can think outside the box and apply your constraints rather than operating under assumptions.

Master Your Domain

Retail companies in particular should focus on their strengths.

Buying the best products and marketing to customers is the core competency of most retailers – not transportation and logistics. In that case, an outside expert can offer an unbiased, view informed by supply chain best practices effective in varied industries and many different retail organizations.

Hire an outside expert that can leverage fulfillment expertise, data and supply chain planning to help take care of customer delivery demands, so you can focus on the retail areas where you excel.

Manage Fulfillment Cost, Support Prime Performance

We are in an era where higher fulfillment costs continue to erode retail margins. It’s time for stores to think harder about how to fulfill orders across all channels, while also factoring in parcel transportation costs and how to package in a way that minimizes dimensional charges.

The complexities of omnichannel fulfillment and all the requirements that come along with it drives many retailers to rethink store layout plans, network design and support partners. Applying the Service Merchandise approach to customer experience in the 1980s could give today’s retailers a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

To help retailers understand how Service Merchandise delivered experience and omnichannel excellence we created “Prime Before Its Time: The Service Merchandise Experience.”

Download the guide to learn how the retail innovations of yesterday can help you deliver a prime performance today.

Data Analysis: What is Your Data Trying to Tell You?

Unfortunately, many organizations still operate in siloed environments with data collected and housed in fragments across different departments, such as location-based procurement teams. Organizations that expand their data management and data analysis capabilities often do so without verifying the accuracy and depth of the data. There may be a mismatch between what products have been sold, what’s been shipped, and what’s been returned. What’s in the database may not reflect the reality on the inventory shelves. Or product data may have incorrect dimensions, leading to false assumptions about warehouse space and shipping weights.

The results of initiatives such as inventory optimization and carrier compliance could be skewed from low-quality data, leading to decisions that could reduce efficiency in your supply chain.

Are you making decisions driven by inaccurate data?

Analysis Drives Decisions, Start with Better Data

Good decisions start with clean, accurate data. Data input via manual processes or information that may require on-the-spot decision-making tends to have lower accuracy than data collected through technology. Back-end systems that are incompatible may require redundant inputs, leading to duplication and mistake

As the flood of data grows, it’s vital to close the loop – collection is not enough. The information must be converted to actionable insights to deliver value across the supply chain. Clean data is simply information that reflects a high degree of confidence in its accuracy, stored in the correct, usable format.

Confirm Accuracy, End Goal before Analysis

Identify end uses. Decide which challenges you want the data to help solve to decide which data to collect.

Implement standards. Develop standards for collecting and manage data such as formats and keywords.

Focus on the most relevant information. Understand the inputs that are most critical to your business

Convert to actionable insights. Focus on data for KPIs and decision-making.

With accurate, thorough data, your organization can uncover hidden opportunities to optimize your processes. Optimization software and simulation tools can reveal options that drive structural changes to deliver the highest level of value to the customer. With increasing customer expectations for improved visibility into product locations and expected delivery times, data accuracy has never been more essential.

Objective Data View Accelerates Performance

Keep in mind that data accuracy is a marathon, not a sprint. It requires systems and policies in place over the long term. Work with an Enterprise Logistics Provider with deep technical expertise in data analysis and cleaning processes to improve current data and set up improved processes going forward. A trusted third party can help develop an objective view of your data landscape, including visibility down to the SKU level to generate strategic insights and shape demand forecasting. 

For more insights into your data accuracy journey, read our resource guide: AI, Blockchain, Machine Learning: Is Your Data Ready?

Where is zip code 99999? A Piece of Clean Data Makes a Big Difference

Of course not. It doesn’t exist. In fact, the highest real zip code is 99950, for Ketchikan, Alaska. Still, if you scour your database, there’s a good chance you’ll find more than a few 99999 zip codes. 

Most organizations find that it’s been entered as a placeholder in their shipment database. If shipments go as planned, what’s the problem? If your strategy calls for automating your processes, you’ll encounter serious challenges created by a lack of data accuracy. Let’s talk about how data becomes inaccurate and what you can do about it.

Dirty Data Drives Supply Chain Inefficiency 

Depending on the solutions in use, a database may fill in 99999 if no zip code is entered, or 99999 may have been entered rather than taking the time to look up the correct number. While a placeholder zip code may not be a fatal problem, it’s likely an indicator of deeper issues. That’s one reason industry experts estimate that data is faulty in 35 to 40 percent of supply chain systems.

For example, look at a company’s fundamental systems such as the Item Master, Customer Master and Vendor Master. They must be comprehensively reviewed and corrected. Basic data such as dimension and weights could be filled with default numbers. That means there’s been a lack of validation of the data that’s been input. The lack of accurate, clean data leads to expensive inefficiency through mistakes and a lot of manual handling. 

While individual data problems are not good, they are also a symptom of the more significant challenge of potentially suspect data. Without the right numbers as a baseline, it’s impossible to make accurate strategic decisions. If you’re looking at adding or repositioning distribution centers, rationalizing your product lines, or myriad other initiatives, clean data makes all the difference. 

Clean data is also essential for implementing automation, artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies. Poor data quality can lead to problems with carrier compliance, shipment tracking and predictive and prescriptive analytics. As shipments generate more and more data in real-time, quality data is essential. It’s also vital for decision-making and sharing with strategic partners to drive benefits across your shipping eco-system.

Solving the Dirty Data Problem

How do you correct the zip code 99999 problem in your company? 

The key is to evaluate the integrity of data collection and management programs continuously, not only against your internal requirements but also in relation to external demands. Does your organization have the capability to dig deep into your data collection and management programs, identify challenges and fix them with internal resources? Or will the organizational structures and culture prevent you from making the necessary changes? Third-party analysis may be required to identify the data issues that will derail your competitiveness.

To find out more about ensuring your organization is prepared for next-generation technologies, read our resource guide, AI, Blockchain, Machine Learning: Is Your Data Ready?