Last Days to Ship? 7 Tips to Meet Holiday Deadlines

According to MarketWatch, Deloitte is forecasting a 1% to 1.5% year-over-year sales increase for the upcoming holiday season, during which time total retail sales will be about $1.15 billion (between November 2020 and January 2021). Meeting holiday shipping deadlines will be more important than ever.

“E-commerce sales, which have been strong throughout the coronavirus pandemic, are expected to climb 25% to 35%, reaching $182 billion and $196 billion,” Deloitte predicts. “Regardless of the scenario, however, consumers’ focus on health, financial concerns, and safety will result in a shift in the way they spend their holiday budget.”  

Here are seven tips for making sure your holiday packages get to their destinations on time.

7 Tips for Holiday Delivery Success 

The new realities of the current shipping environment have created ongoing service delays and disruptions, both of which have compounded into an overall capacity crunch for small parcel carriers. Working through this issue will require forward-thinking companies to adjust accordingly.

For example, shippers will need to be more creative and flexible to cope with the combination of COVID and the normal peak season. FedEx, UPS, and other carriers are hiring a lot more workers for the season, but we still expect to see some capacity issues. With the uncertainty, it will be more important than ever to inform customers when to expect shipments and be extremely transparent. 

Here are seven tips that will help you get your packages to their destinations on time: 

  1. Know the cutoff dates. FedEx’s last days to ship calendar is online here and UPS publishes its holiday deadlines here. The USPS plans to release its cutoff dates for holiday shipping sometime in October. Be sure to factor in these last days to ship dates when planning your holiday shipments. 
  2. Talk to your carriers. Proactively communicate with carriers regarding any expected increase in volume and any additional equipment requirements (e.g., feeders or bulk-type pickups). This will help your carriers plan ahead and provide some assurance that there will be capacity to accommodate your volume spikes (or, allow you to make alternative arrangements). 
  3. Next, talk to your customers. Companies should proactively communicate anticipated delays and properly set customer’s expectations on their websites and in any email communications. This could be as simple as featuring the holiday cutoff shipment dates prominently on the first page of your website. 
  4. Know the limits. Shippers should clearly understand any potential volume limits or caps that may be put in place by the carriers. Because these constraints can impact your ability to deliver on time, be sure to discuss them with your carrier. 
  5. Explore your options. Shippers should also understand their carrier options and negotiate favorable agreement terms to properly leverage all national, regional, and postal carriers. Having a “Plan B” in place is always a good idea during the busiest times of the year. 

  1. Start your product promos early. Don’t wait until the last minute to kick off your holiday promotions. Starting early will help you pull volume forward to avoid peak shipping periods and allow time for expected delays. 
  2. Factor in holiday business schedules. For example, USPS is closed for all of the major federal holidays. With delivery times varying between its services, knowing the cutoff dates and hours of operation are both important. 

Maintaining Transparency  

Reflecting on how parcel carriers performed for the 2019-20 holiday shipping season, UPS’ SurePost and FedEx’s SmartPost both assured 100% delivery for holiday orders that were shipped on or before December 14 or 9 (respectively). However, we also saw that as the cutoff date approached, those commitments slipped. This is something to keep in mind as you lay out your plans for the 2020-21 season. 

Using the tips outlined in this article, you can strike a nice balance between growing your company’s holiday sales while also letting customers know that there is a risk of passing the carrier’s “suggested date” for accepting pickup for a Christmas delivery. Through full transparency and good information, you can effectively manage customer expectations while also syncing with the carriers that will deliver the goods to their doorsteps.  

Peak Season Performance Requires Visibility

To make sure holiday shippers are aware of the latest trends affecting their transportation cost management, we convened a roundtable of our parcel experts. Watch or listen to our webinar “Peak Season: Are You Ready?” to hear Todd Benge, Robyn Meyer, Toni Caputo, Bernie Reeb and myself address the unprecedented challenges emerging his year.

This digital event shares strategies to help you protect profit and enhance customer experience. Watch it today to make sure you are getting charged correctly and manage the capacity risks that threaten to derail your performance.

Lean Supply Chain Perspective Required for New Normal

Meanwhile, the pressure is on lean-focused supply chain experts expected to examine internal processes and accommodate supply chain shortfalls. Their perspective is integral not just to the continuous improvement of in-house activities, but, importantly, to the network adjustments that come with the re-shoring of supply production.

Unfortunately, just as COVID-19 disrupted manufacturing networks, it also created new challenges for keeping lean supply chain teams engaged. Workforce reductions and remote operating environments create hurdles for maintaining the close awareness required to identify wasteful activity and efficiency improvement opportunities.

As manufacturers focus on a new normal, a lean perspective supports supply chain corrections, and the timeline for turnaround does not need to be limited by social distancing and remote environments. An expert partner can help you identify and execute the most effective supply network strategy, so you can keep focus on advancing your business.

New Manufacturing Normal Begins to Emerge

Midway through a year of disruption, we are hearing common refrains among manufacturers across diverse industries. It seems that, regardless of the supply chain network, the comments are very similar:

  • Manufacturing is moving toward reshoring to reduce supply chain disruption and distance.
  • Constant supply chain focus is needed to eliminate current and future supply chain disruptions.
  • Supply chain failure is the No. 1 reason a company is having issues in start-up or restart activities.
  • Adjusting product mix and production set-up is a struggle.
  • Lean training and learning is difficult outside the facility “Gemba”

Focused on cost, some companies furloughed or laid off their lean teams. This leads to significant impact across the organization, often requiring executive attention to resolve emerging network problems. Losing the process visibility provided by these experts can lead to costly misalignment across your existing network and in any future supply chain adjustments.

Problem Solving for Inventory Management, Network Changes 

Looking deeper at these trends, some of the specific emerging problems can be resolved through the total supply network awareness your lean expert maintains. 

Inventory management drives the biggest questions manufacturers encounter as they reset to serve a new normal. Common inventory problems in our assessments of  manufacturers include:

  • Too much of it, not balanced or not accurate.
  • Too much of the wrong inventory for the manufacturing product family mix.
  • Not enough of the correct inventory to manufacture replacement parts and service clients.
  • Never adjusted parts inventories for major equipment repairs.
  • Single sourcing from Asia, Europe, etc.

Losing the visibility of your supply chain expert can quickly impact your transportation cost, especially in a volatile environment following a significant disruption.

Organizations that scaled back their lean team during COVID-19 experienced common outcomes:

  • Quickly lost awareness to inbound ocean transportation and ensuing TL freight moves
  • Unprepared for spike in air freight costs for productions and parts inventory
  • Increased costs such as detention fees resulting from misaligned lead times and production planning
  • Reduced capacity for problem solving 

In the “old” normal environment, while your lean resources maintained process awareness required to exert continuous improvement, ongoing training also offered perspective for global practices that are applicable within your organization. Losing access to those resources – usually provided on-site – impedes your ability to evolve your processes.

Leverage a Master Partner to Evolve Processes

There is no doubt that a loss of process monitoring inside the operational environment leads to reduced visibility. Lean operators need to be in the Gemba to be most effective.

In a quarantine or remote environment, it is not always possible to have that consistent on-site presence – but, you don’t always need it. Some organizations have achieved success with lean supply chain teams of two that maintain social distance and COVID-19 protocols. While this has slowed Kaizen work, there has been success, it just takes longer than planned. As a positive outcome, lean leaders have executed administrative items for each Kaizen, a process that can be carried forward.

A problem solver’s mentality supports these types of in-the-trenches adjustments, and they are vital not only to your disruption response, but to the ongoing evolution of your supply chain. We offer our clients access to that mentality on an ongoing basis, using supply chain data analysis to provide awareness of emerging improvement opportunities.

At the same time, we offer organizations the ability to develop their own internal lean expertise. While protocols of a contact-conscious environment can limit on-site activity, the power of modern technology not only supports classroom-like digital learning, it also grants virtual visibility on par with physical presence.

For more information about invigorating your organization’s supply chain capabilities to support reshoring or other new practices for a new normal, schedule your lean supply chain consultation today. Whether you want to bolster the expertise of your internal resources or plan and design a supply chain network suitable for serving your customers tomorrow, we apply our mastery to help you establish efficient processes that control cost and improve service.

Examine Indirect Spend to Drive COVID-19 Cost Savings

The spread of the COVID-19 virus disrupts transportation networks, products paths and consumer demands that drive your performance. The problems that threaten business viability merit priority response.

In the current Coronavirus climate, the supplies for your everyday functions also need attention. An expert partner who can take over management of complex indirect spend areas can provide critical cost savings, which you can rapidly deploy in other areas of your business.

A reliable sourcing resource can also leverage long-term relationships and collective buying power to help make sure you have the Maintenance, Repair and Operation (MRO) items, office products, and packaging materials required to support your operations.

Here’s some of the latest marketplace activities that could affect costs in your indirect spend categories and challenge your ability to secure vital supplies.

MRO Items for Health, Safety in Short Supply

Most organizations that support MRO procurement are operating distribution centers and warehouses as usual, with added attention to necessary safety precautions at these work sites. Products are still moving out facility doors. However, distributors are placing priority on serving needs for specific “essential” industries, such as healthcare providers and first responders.

That’s a good business decision for these supplier partners, particularly as they face short supplies for personal protection equipment. Protective gloves, masks, coverall suits and similar products are all in back-order status.

Although healthcare facilities get priority service for these items, if you have needs, go ahead and place orders with your supply partners to make sure you are in the queue when supplies become available.

To expedite MRO service, many suppliers are shipping products directly to production facilities. This can expedite the process of getting needed products to end users. Make sure to explore direct shipping options from your supplier partners.

Social Distancing Affects Vendor Managed MRO Inventory Process

One of the biggest impacts of the novel Coronavirus in the MRO space is in the area of vendor managed inventory. State and federal directives are limiting contact restrict suppliers’ ability to complete on-site visits to monitor MRO supply needs.

Vendors provide an important resource in making sure you manage an optimal supply of MRO items. Too much product can consume valuable operational and storage space. Too few resources can threaten a shutdown at critical times.

To make sure their clients are able to continue monitoring their MRO needs, many suppliers are providing hand-held scanners and creating a customer-managed inventory environment. This keeps products moving, but it is important to monitor activity. Supply inventory can quickly get out of balance and create unnecessary costs.

Available Office and Facility Supplies Still Moving

Distribution of office and facility supply products continues as usual, but many of the same products in short supply on grocery store shelves are also limited in commercial and industrial settings. Paper products, disinfectant, hand sanitizer and similar products get priority delivery to healthcare operations, leaving a short supply which puts limits on available resources.

In some geographical regions, the desktop delivery option is discontinued, and the typical next day delivery guarantee is suspended. While there’s no sign of a supply crisis for the majority of these items, it may become harder to get some of the more common office and facility supply items as more states adapt to shelter-in-place environments..

When you are dealing with your supplier partners, a little bit of patience can go a long way. Like many of us, they are working in remote environments. In some cases, companies providing essential workplace supplies employ thousands of people unaccustomed to working outside of the office. As they shift remote, some systems aren’t engineered to handle additional workflow yet.

Rest assured, your supply partner is working to meet your needs. When you seek support, response may be delayed, but having patience with your trusted partner can reap benefits today and tomorrow.

If you encounter supply changes, we can leverage our power as a Group Purchasing Organization to tap additional supply resources. In the world of indirect sourcing, strategic partnerships not only support a network of options, but they also can help realize significant cost savings.

E-Commerce Drives Boom in Cardboard, Packaging

Many manufacturers and distributors of packaging are deemed essential because they are supporting medical supplies, pharmaceuticals, energy generation, and food and beverages. Increasingly, operations not supporting essential end uses are production reduction or shutdown.

Corrugate facilities are running at full capacity to meet a demand spike driven by online ordering. One key area to watch in this aspect of packaging is linerboard prices. Right now, those prices are stable after a slight decrease in January. Linerboard pricing will deserve a close eye over the next few months as old corrugated container (OCC) prices rise and forecast demand increases.

For flexible packaging products like polybags, stretch film, poly sheeting, etc., prices continue to decline due to a decrease in global oil prices. With many e-commerce shipments relying on these materials, it will still be important to monitor not just cost, but ability to access supply.

Rely on Strategic Sourcing, Relationships, Patience to Weather the Storm

When it comes to indirect materials that support operational process, many organizations make purchases on a tactical basis. Now, when uncertainty clouds the market place, a partner that deploys a strategic mindset to indirect spend can be a vital resource.

Transportation Insight has developed strategic partnerships with suppliers. In communicating with our supplier partners more and more, we’re learning that MRO, office supply and packaging providers are supporting the clients that work well with them. When you’ve built relationships over decades, as we have, achieving win-win scenarios for everyone involved becomes second nature.

Let us leverage the partnerships we’ve created to help you get indirect spend reductions, and, more importantly, access reliable supplier partners that you can depend on during times like these.

Right now, many organizations are thinking about short-term survival. As you prepare for business after the COVID-19 pandemic recedes, instead of revisiting old strategies, consider opportunities that deliver better service at improved cost.

Let us show you a more strategic way of addressing your indirect spend management. To understand how much you can start saving today, schedule an indirect spend assessment. We often achieve double-digit savings for our clients, and we may be able to help you drive cost out of your supply chain.

What Do We Do with All These Returns? E-commerce and Reverse Logistics

That’s because consumers return goods bought online more often than they return in-store purchases. The Reverse Logistics Association reports that e-commerce return rates are three to four times higher than brick-and-mortar store rates. The volume you can expect varies according to product category, but plan on an average return rate of 25 to 35 percent.

Navigating reverse logistics requirements is new ground for most manufacturers that don’t experience processing and filling direct-to-consumer orders. It’s important to consider what’s involved and various process options, including outsourcing, before launching an e-commerce operation. 

Efficiency is Important to Both Brands and Shoppers

Returned goods must be inspected, re-packaged if necessary, and returned to inventory as quickly as possible so they can be purchased again. Getting returns back into inventory immediately is particularly important with popular items, merchandise with a short selling season, and during the intense holiday selling season. 

An effective reverse logistics process goes beyond getting sellable merchandise back into inventory quickly. It has an impact on brand loyalty, too. According to the Narvar Consumer Report 2018, customers are more likely to buy from you again if it’s easy to return merchandise. Of the nearly 70 percent of surveyed consumers who described their recent e-commerce return experience as easy or very easy, almost all – 96 percent – said they’d shop with that retailer again because of that ease. 

A successful reverse logistics process, then, needs to work for both the e-tailer and its customers. Consumers want an easy returns process; manufacturers want and need one that’s affordable and effective. 

Reverse Logistics Requirements

To meet these requirements, companies take into account:

  • Physical requirements: The reverse 
    logistics operation needs a  separate space dedicated to receiving, inspecting, and processing returns. 
  • Product inspection: Every returned item needs to be inspected by trained staff to determine next steps. 
  • Inspection outcomes: Inspectors make next-step decisions based on product condition and consumer demand. Options include returning it to inventory immediately, replacing the packaging, repairing or refurbishing, donating, and discarding.  

Manufacturers new to e-commerce often lack the expertise needed to manage these and other aspects of an efficient reverse logistics operation. Outsourcing the function to trusted partners allows brands to master the order fulfillment processes and identify trends and patterns in returns before deciding whether to bring reverse logistics in-house. 

Managing Reverse Logistics Costs

An experienced enterprise logistics provider can also positively impact on reverse logistics expenses. When working with an omni-channel accessories company to refine its online shopping and returns experience, Transportation Insight was able to help the company reduce its overall transportation spending by 21 percent. In addition, Transportation Insight’s solution helped the company marry parcel costs with actual product costs to determine net profit on every product shipped.

Brands continue to look for ways to reduce the number of returns and the associated transportation expenses. One major online apparel retailer is working to reduce the number of returns by doing more before the purchase to help consumers feel confident that they’re ordering the right size.

In situations involving heavy home products such as furniture and appliances, companies are getting creative. To reduce the number of deliveries rejected and returned because of damage, some manufacturers unbox and inspect the merchandise in regional fulfillment centers before home delivery. In other situations, delivery personnel are empowered to negotiate with the customer during delivery to resolve potential problems in a way that reduces the return rate. 

E-commerce businesses need more than a reverse logistics process – they need one that encourages consumers to continue to buy from them, gets goods returned as cost-effectively as possible, and restores merchandise to inventory quickly. 

Ready to learn how manufacturers can create an efficient and effective e-commerce program that includes reverse logistics? Download Transportation Insight’s e-commerce guide, “Start the Cart: A Manufacturer’s Guide to Achieving E-Commerce Fulfillment Excellence.”

7 Pitfalls Imperil Indirect Spend Management

Indirect Spend analysis requires different processes and technology knowledge from those of direct procurement. There are more stakeholders, segment complexities, and varying levels of expertise at the suppliers. Some items are commodities, and others are specialized for a business unit and rely upon a continually changing and improving set of technologies.

Efforts to improve Indirect Spend management relies on a complete understanding of the wide variability in factors that affect the cost of an item, the cost of procurement and issues that arise for vendor and buyer .

7 Variables Complicating Indirect Spend Management

  1. Low Average Spend: The product volume is generally on the smaller side because of the wide assortment of product and service categories and a large number of suppliers. In this case, the procurement group is unable to coerce better pricing or terms during negotiations with suppliers.
  2. Frequent low-volume purchases: Often, the frequency of purchases of small individual values, makes indirect sourcing difficult and resource-intensive.
  3. Maverick/Uncontrolled/ Non-negotiated Spend: Maverick Spend is the purchase of legitimate goods but using unauthorized buying arrangements or unapproved suppliers. Companies understand the value of robust management of direct spend, but may not recognize the benefits of managing Indirect Spend. The fact is that cost savings for indirect procurement does not originate from a specific bill of materials, as with direct procurement. Often, companies underestimate the Indirect Spend totals and the potential cost savings. Indirect Spend purchases usually are not covered by a contract negotiated in collaboration with a professional procurement group. Items purchased outside of an agreement could be a one-time purchase of office supplies, or travel expenditures, or expenditure on critical ad-hoc technical troubleshooting services. These costs add up over hundreds of items, categories, suppliers, and transactions.
  4. Driven More by Internal Stakeholders: Indirect procurement professionals may not have any mandate over an internal stakeholder’s budget. Unlike with direct spend, the procurement group has less say concerning Indirect Spend. Internal stakeholders hold on tightly to their approved budget and spending authority. Also, many of the expenditures require in-depth industry knowledge and experience to specify a product or service. These factors and this complexity make it more difficult for the procurement function to control indirect spending. The company’s procurement team must act as an internal advisor, influencing decision-makers about optimizing spend and getting more from suppliers.
  5. Hard to Evaluate: There exists hundreds of categories, adjacent categories, item suppliers and distributors, and each mandates an exceptional understanding to procure cost-effectively and also with an eye on long-term value to the company. Each of the tens of thousands of suppliers invests in a sales team assigned to each buyer. Motivation for those sales teams may not always be in the buyers’ best interest.
  6. Measuring Suppliers: It can be more challenging to measure the quality of indirect goods and services. There might be metrics for individual vendor performance, but there are few industry standards against which to benchmark those metrics. In some cases, delivery of indirect products and services is not in a company’s ERP system, so tracking contract renewal and evaluating vendors can be spotty. 
  7. Requires Diverse Experience: Purchases are as diverse as safety products, marketing software, maintenance items, and electricity supply. This breadth of categories requires a procurement group with expertise and a willingness to learn the full range of products and services.


Indirect Spend Management Requires Broad Capabilities

Organizations working to manage Indirect Spend must maintain a variety of skill sets within the operational areas tasked with overseeing these critical budget areas. 

Facing these diverse needs, companies are often challenged to maintain the level of expertise that a trusted procurement partner can often provide:

  • Professional purchasing experience or training
  • Broad category expertise
  • Project and change management
  • Influencing, engaging and advising budget-owners (stakeholders) across the company
  • Specification, facilitation, negotiation, and supplier management
  • Data analysis, creating business insight from raw data
  • Technological know-how
  • Recognizing supply risk from issues like constraints on industry capacity, regulation, or rapidly rising demand
  • Acknowledging the market’s preference for sustainability and the ability to cost-effectively comply
  • Understanding of current market conditions and market pricing trends

Strategic Sourcing Supports Procurement Decisions

Buyers are not all the same. Many procurement decisions have an economic buyer, the person who makes the money decision, and a needs buyer, the person with a job-to-be-done.

Guidance from a procurement group can help meet the requirements of both of these buyer-types. Proper specification of the product or service delivers what conforms to the need, while aggregating volumes and dutiful negotiations keep prices low.

By employing a Strategic Sourcing mindset, these procurement experts look across all activity to address planning, supplier qualification, item specifications, technology advances, training, support, outsourcing, contract negotiation and periodic contract review. Strategic Sourcing identifies the lowest total cost − not just the lowest purchase price. It embraces the procurement lifecycle, from specification to payment.

Strategic sourcing often creates a close, partner-like relationship with a supplier to meet the needs of all buyers, and in turn, improve service to end customers. For more information on employing a strategic sourcing mindset to control Indirect Spend costs through improved procurement practices, download Transportation Insight free guide, “Uncover Indirect Spend: Control Cost with Strategic Sourcing.”

Personalized solutions for secondary packaging can enhance customer experience.

Exploring the Importance and Challenges of Secondary Packaging

Secondary packaging is the practice of using a branded, often personalized packaging option for the item a customer orders. From there, that container is boxed for shipping in a more typical package. This lets you create the personal, specialized package without exposing your goods to damage or as much risk of theft during shipping. This type of strategy could be critical in laying the groundwork for more personalized e-commerce experiences, but secondary packaging also comes with significant challenges that must be overcome.

Responding to E-Commerce Growth Through Personalization

A study from Wise Guy Reports predicted the global e-commerce market would expand at a compound annual growth rate greater than 10 percent from 2018 through 2021. To a great extent, this growth is being driven by a blend of increased demand and greater sophistication in using technology to improve logistics processes within the sector.

As e-commerce continues to grow, brands are constantly exploring ways to create competitive advantages. Promoting stronger customer experiences is critical here, and personalization is emerging as a key option. A Segment study found that approximately 71 percent of consumers get frustrated by impersonal shopping experiences. Another 40 percent of consumers said they’ve purchased something more expensive than their original intent due to a personalized experience. Ultimately, 44 percent of those involved in the study said they are likely to become repeat buyers if their interactions with the brand are personalized.

While a lot of this data points to digital marketing initiatives, that isn’t the only way to capitalize on the demand for personalized experiences. For example, shipping experts and logistics partners can work with you to implement secondary packaging strategies alongside other advanced supply chain strategies to help you take advantage of the opportunities created by personalization.

Offering End-to-End Personalization

Data lays the groundwork for personalization. Gathering customer data, organizing it, integrating it across lines of business, and delivering it to end users in an actionable way is key to providing personal experiences. If customers are logged in on your website, you can feature products based on their shopping history. If they are completing an order, you can save payment details and shipping information to ensure a smooth checkout. After the purchase, you can offer follow-up emails with promotional offers and content that supports a better user experience, such as assembly videos for furniture purchased online.

All of these personalized touch points can bolster the customer experience, but it’s important to move personalization beyond the digital realm. If a person buys a good in a store, you may provide a variety of amenities that create a more personal, branded experience. Something as simple as a high-quality box with eye-catching visual design and intelligent interior packaging can make a huge difference. Providing user guides, information on related products, or similar materials can provide a personal touch, guiding shoppers to more interactions with your brand. Secondary packaging lets you extend this opportunity through the shipping process.

The difference between a personal, customer-focused experience with secondary packaging and a standard shipping situation can be encapsulated in a simple idea. Imagine what happens when a customer opens the box. In a standard environment, they’d sort through packaging materials finding their items and materials. With secondary packaging, they open the box to a cultivated experience with a designed box and supplementary materials that add excitement to getting the item that was purchased.

Creating a Framework for Secondary Packaging

While secondary packaging is promising from a customer experience perspective, it does create complexity. You’ll need to:

  • Design packaging that will be attractive to the customers you are targeting.
  • Pack materials in safe, attractive ways that guide users through the process of exploring their new item.
  • Adjust inventory management to ensure you always have supply for secondary packaging elements, including boxes, inserts, and user materials.
  • Manage safe, secure, and accurate preparation for shipping.
  • Ensure your final packaging complies with requirements from your shipping partners or carriers.

Data visibility is critical in all of these processes as managers across lines of business need to understand sales and shipping expectations to maintain supplies and manage specific customer orders. An effective secondary packaging strategy often forces organizations to treat each package as a unique shipment, not simply a box that needs a unique address label.

Getting Started with Secondary Packaging

Making the deep process changes needed to support secondary packaging begins with a deep understanding of every facet of your supply chain. Enterprise logistics partners bring expertise and technology to help you understand everything from your carrier relationships to your packaging supply chain with greater precision. From there, a partner can empower you to make strategic operational changes that let you integrate secondary packaging into your parcel management processes as seamlessly as possible. Transportation Insight is leading the way toward logistics innovation through our unique approach to partnering with clients. Contact us today to learn how we can help you drive personal e-commerce experiences.