2021 Parcel Rates: 3 Areas for Attention

The average rate increase for primary services provided by UPS and FedEx mirrors that same familiar 4.9 percent increase that we have seen for many years. 

And just as we have seen for many years, the 2021 parcel rates increase announcements are just a visible layer in the carriers’ rate and service pricing structures. With multiple layers, the complex pricing and surcharge practices of UPS and FedEx can make it difficult to determine the true cost for your small package shipments. 

Beyond the average increase on standard services, it is also important to recognize that surcharges, accessorials, new fees and tweaks to the carriers’ terms and conditions could require you to budget a 2021 cost increase closer to 8.5 percent. Capacity pressures created by exponential e-commerce growth during the pandemic and uncertainty about mid-year or peak surcharges for 2021 creates an environment of unknowns.

You need to understand how your shipment characteristics align with carrier networks. If you are a large shipper with a great contract, be prepared to defend that as tight capacity drives renegotiation motives for UPS and FedEx. Your parcel partner can be a real asset during this time if they have the ability to analyze your historic performance and determine areas for future cost savings that do not jeopardize performance. 

Let’s explore three aspects of this year’s parcel rate increase that could drive new costs in your transportation budget. 

  • Expanded ZIP Codes for Delivery Area Surcharge 

More ZIP codes than ever before will be eligible for Delivery Area Surcharges (DAS) for both UPS and FedEx. Both carriers adjust the applicable ZIP codes every year, but the past two years have reflected significant changes. In 2021, these charges will apply to almost 38 percent of the United States.

The increase for UPS DAS areas will apply to almost 12.3 million people, while the FedEx changes will affect about 11 million people. Ultimately, that means you are facing an additional surcharge for more of your customers. 

This is a difficult adjustment to calculate on your own, but when that much of your customer-base is affected by new costs, deep analysis is required to determine how these changes will impact your budget in 2021.

We talked more about the changes around DAS during our recent parcel rates webinar. Watch the replay for more insight on the how and the why behind this move by the carriers. 

  • Additional Handling Charges for Large Parcels and More to Come

    If your packages measure over 105 inches in length and girth combined, you will be charged an Additional Handling Fee of $16. This dimension change on the fee targets packages that barely miss the Oversize criteria of 130 inches (L and W combined). It applies to packages that take up a lot of space on conveyor belts, but do not get charged high dimensional weight.  

    Parcel carriers are becoming increasingly selective about the packages that move through their automated networks. Large packages, in certain instances, can cause significant problems in an automated facility. Moving them often requires more work from human resources, a costly and time-consuming element. 

    Beyond this $16 charge, UPS is also implementing a new structure for additional handling and large package rates that will differ by zone. Those rates will be announced at a later date, April 11, 2021 for non-hundred-weight packages and July 11, 2021 for hundredweight packages. 

    For heavy retail customers that are not clothing-oriented, this change could create a significant impact. We work with clients to identify specific impacts and solutions to mitigate the added cost.
  • Lightweight 2021 Parcel Rates Face Steepest Increases

    It is important to understand that when the carriers have a rate increase, it is not a universal rate increase across all weights and zones. The average rate increase is 4.9 percent. The level of rate increase for your volume depends on your shipping characteristics. For many shippers a larger percentage of their packages qualify for minimum charges, especially larger shippers with more aggressive pricing. 

    This year, parcel shippers charged at the zone 2, 1-pound minimum will face a steeper increase – about 6.4 percent – than their counterparts in other weight and zone combinations. Likewise, UPS and FedEx rates match between 1 and 15 pounds, and for these lightweight shipments the increases are generally higher than those for heavier packages. 

This strategy of larger increases on lightweight packages is an abrupt change for UPS and FedEx. Two factors likely affect the decision:

  • Competition from Priority Mail: Last year (before COVID-19), FedEx and UPS were both concerned with competition from Priority Mail. Lightweight Priority Mail rates are significantly lower than UPS and FedEx Ground rates, especially to residential addresses. Heading into 2021 with the parcel industry at capacity, there is less concern on competitiveness and more emphasis on profitability.’
  • Profitability: Lightweight packages are typically less profitable for small package carriers than heavier weight packages. Carriers are likely to continue to increase lightweight packages at higher levels as long as there are capacity constraints. Regional carriers can offer an efficient alternative in some of your lightweight shipping scenarios. In light of capacity challenges and other disruptions during 2020, many of these operations have filled a niche and grown. These carriers can sometimes be easier to implement, and they don’t often bring the surcharges the national carriers apply.

    During our Parcel Rates Roundtable we share tips for leveraging regional carriers as part of your parcel program. Watch the webinar to make sure that type of move does not drive up cost with your national carrier due to your tier commitments.

Parcel Bills: Do Not Pay Late

Another area for attention: when its GRI takes effect Jan. 4, 2021, FedEx will begin applying a 6 percent late payment fee. UPS implemented this fee in 2004, and this gives FedEx customers cause to pay close attention to the payment terms in their contracts. 

Not paying your bills on time now becomes a more financially impactful decision, and these fees can add because they apply at the invoice level.

Master Your Parcel Plan, Minimize Rate Impact. 

Do you have your finger on the pulse of your parcel program so you can understand the true cost impact of the 2021 annual General Rate Increase across your end-to-end supply chain?

Questions to consider:

  • How do your contract terms and conditions address volume caps?
  • How will volume caps affect your actual rate increase, surcharges and other fees?
  • How does your customer base change now that more than 11 million people have been added to the DAS delivery charge?
  • How do you budget for these changes?

Open our Parcel Rate Outlook 2021 for our expert support in preparing a plan that carefully considers these questions – and all changes across the parcel environment. Leveraging deep parcel expertise, tools and technology, we’re able to provide rate impact analysis specific to your personal needs and design a business solution that controls cost and protects experience.

Get our Parcel Rate Outlook 2021 today and make sure your 2021 transportation budget considers the nuances lurking in the layers below the 4.9 percent average rate increase.

UPS Announces Last Day to Ship

A later-than-usual Thanksgiving on Nov. 26 condenses the shipping season by almost a week. Meanwhile, continuing effects of COVID-19 drive more buyers online to fill holiday wish lists – and many of them will avoid the personal contact of store shopping altogether.

Combined, these factors predict a capacity crunch for the small package networks. Already experiencing service delays and disruptions, these networks will not see relief until after the New Year, even as parcel carriers bring on thousands of new workers.

Be mindful of the “last shipping days” announced by UPS and FedEx, but that may not be enough to avoid a disappointed holiday customer in 2021. That’s why the world’s largest retailers are turning the holiday shopping clock from Black Friday toward a “Black October.”

Navigating this year’s peak season during the middle of a pandemic will require companies to be more creative and flexible. Forward-thinking shippers should be prepared to adjust. 

Retailers Drive Christmas Creep, Protect Experience

Amazon’s Prime Days on Oct. 13-14 delivered $3.5 billion in sales to small- and mid-sized businesses, with a 60 percent uptick in sales over last year. The move expedites holiday shopping – and product shipping. It also adheres to latest guidance from UPS: “encourage your customers to shop earlier than ever with special offers or other incentives.” FedEx echoes the same advice for shippers preparing for the 2021 holiday season.

Promotions like Walmart’s “Big Save Days” and Target’s “Deal Days” are all designed to pull parcel volume forward and avoid a costly catastrophe caused by a lack of capacity in December. 

If your organization is focused on protecting customer experience this holiday season, keep these five things in mind: 

  1. It is more important than ever to make sure that you proactively and clearly communicate the potential for delays. Every year the national carriers suspend their on-time guarantees during the holiday period. Earlier this year they suspended the guarantees due to COVID-19 complications and disruptions.
  2. Retailers can ship-to-stores for curbside pickup.
  3. Retailers can also ship-from-stores to shorten the distance that the package travels in the carrier’s networks and thereby reduce the potential for delay.
  4. Shipments can be made to alternative delivery locations such as certain retail partners, your customer’s office, or to one of the many parcel lockers.


5. Finally, if you operate multiple DCs across the US, it will be important to have the right inventory at the right locations to speed delivery and avoid split orders.

In a time where lockdowns have driven e-commerce shipments to levels never seen before, companies will need to deploy an all-of-the-above strategy to navigate it appropriately.

Know the Last Days to Ship

Now more than ever, it is important to make every possible effort to avoid deadline shipments. If you anticipate a last-minute holiday rush, make sure your UPS shipments go out on or before these dates to give your parcel the best possible chance to arrive by Dec. 24:

  • UPS Ground: As early as Tuesday, December 15* 
  • UPS 3 Day Select®: Monday, December 21 
  • UPS 2nd Day Air®: Tuesday, December  22 
  • UPS Next Day Air®: Wednesday, December 23

*Note UPS advises that most UPS Ground shipments have a later “last recommended shipping dates.” Shippers can track their transit time and cost here

FedEx released its holiday schedule ahead of UPS, and both schedules align closely. We detailed 7 tips for holiday delivery success shortly after the FedEx announcement. 

Regardless of the service provider you trust with your shipments, through full transparency and good information, you can effectively manage customer expectations while also syncing with the carriers that will deliver the goods to their doorsteps.  

You Shipped it – Did it Make Money?

Protecting customer experience this holiday season will require timely shipments and thorough communications throughout the sales cycle. 

Protecting your organization’s profit while responding to these customer expectations requires additional awareness and proactive measures.

  • Be aware of the Peak Season Surcharges and more importantly the differences for UPS, FedEx, Regional carriers and now the USPS.
  • Perform a detailed analysis to estimate the surcharges financial impact and to mitigate any negative effects on profitability.
  • Identify specific SKUs that will be negatively impacted and make decisions regarding those items to protect profit margins.  
  • Raise the cost of the item.
  • Increase the free shipping threshold.
  • Pass some or all of the additional cost to the customer.
  • Ensure carriers agreements are best in class and that invoices are audited for compliance to them.
  • Make sure you have the right box sizes so that the packaging is only la
    rge enough to adequately protect items during transit.
  • Work to eliminate operational errors that create avoidable costs such as incorrect addresses, unnecessary declared value and unauthorized packages.

To help shippers protect profit on every customer and every order, we created “You Shipped it … But Did You Make any Money.” Open it today for more guidance on making sure your peak season ends in the black.

Why Audit Parcel Service Now? Here’s 4 Reasons

If you don’t think the delivery experience is directly related to customer retention, think again. According to Dimensional Research, of customers who report a bad experience, almost all of them (97 percent) changed their future buying decisions. Further, 58 percent stopped buying from the company, more than half went to a different company for the product or service, and 52 percent told others not to buy the product or service. 

Maybe the shipment was late, perhaps it was damaged, maybe it was delivered to the wrong house, or perhaps the shipping label was wrong in the first place. In the small package shipping environment, it is hard to have awareness of the problem without parcel audit validating the service received.

Whatever caused the problem, the bottom line is that this and other issues could be making you lose customers right at a time when no company can afford to have this happen. Between the global pandemic, the economic recession, and the business volatility occurring in most industries, organizations need to be at the top of their games when it comes to customer service. 

$1.50 Per Package Adds Up Fast

No matter how much customers love your product, many won’t come back if the experience is not good. This should be reason enough to conduct frequent service audits. 

There are also other reasons, some of which do not relate to the customer experience. For example, Transportation Insight recently worked with a shipper that noticed a significant change in its per-package shipping costs. After a service audit, it realized that its cost-per-package had increased by about $1.50 due to a billing adjustment error made by the carrier (for early-morning deliveries). 

Had the shipper not conducted that analysis, there’s no telling when it would have recognized that it was being overcharged by $1.50 per package. Multiply that number times thousands of shipments per year and the value of frequent service audits becomes crystal clear.  

Why Bother Auditing?

With service guarantees being waived right now, many companies are wondering if they still need to audit their invoices and charges. The answer is “yes,” and here’s why: even with these waivers, there are still a high number of errors and ways to ferret out savings on pretty much any transportation bill. 

For example, shippers are still being hit with duplicate charges and other billing errors on top of late, incorrect and damaged shipments — problems that can directly impact customer service and retention. With fewer drivers on the road and higher demand for parcel capacity — largely due to the massive uptick in e-commerce shopping — both loss and damage incidences have increased. 

By auditing every package to make sure it’s successfully delivered, companies can manage the loss and damage process from start to finish. Audits can also uncover data regarding insufficient packaging and ensure that payments are accurate and on time. In fact, auditing is a great risk management tool that companies can use during both peak and regular seasons.    

Here are four more reasons why you need to continue service audits:

  • Good visibility into what you’re actually paying. The audit platform you use should break down carrier invoice details to the charge level to analyze all peak season surcharges, rates, and discounts. This year, we’ve seen a number of rate errors and worked on our clients’ behalf to recover over $1.4 million in savings. We’re also identifying duplicate charges and billing errors at the charge level, which is impossible to do without an invoice audit in place.
  • Make sure it gets there on time and in one piece. Sure, some service guarantees are waived right now, but shippers should still want to audit every package to ensure it is delivered and not lost in transit or damaged. This year, we’ve seen the perfect storm of greater-than-usual demand, fewer drivers, and more retailers shipping items that normally would be purchased and picked up in store. Without a doubt, that’s caused an increase in lost and damaged packages. 
  • Tracking losses and damages. The best approach is to manage the entire loss and damage process from identification to resolution and recovery. So far this year, Transportation Insight has secured over $1.7 million in loss and damage savings, and all while providing data regarding insufficient packaging details down to the SKU level. This is particularly helpful for companies that are introducing new products and/or shipping with new vendors.  
  • Pay accurate bills on time. The data collected during a service audit provides insights into how new surcharges or new carrier rules will impact transportation and the related costs. For example, FedEx recently announced a new late-payment fee effective January 2021. Using a compliance audit, companies can keep close tabs on these types of fees and either avoid them completely (by paying on time) or correcting errors (by flagging erroneous late fees). With so many staffing changes and work-from-home scenarios taking place in 2020, shippers need to be especially careful about paying their carrier invoices correctly and on time.

Helping You Rest Easier

Transportation Insight is the only parcel audit and logistics solution provider that undergoes an annual SOC 1 Type II third-party compliance audit. We check every parcel package within your supply chain to make sure you’re getting the service you selected at your contracted price. For example, if your company is paying for guaranteed service, Saturday pickup or delivery, or other services, we’ll make sure you get them. We also check for invalid pickup, as well as identify and follow up on lost or damaged packages.

Possessing deep industry expertise, our parcel team also monitors ongoing changes in the small package environment to help keep shippers apprised of the emerging cost-drivers that affect their profitable performance. 

E-commerce Supply Chain 2020: Digital Deck the Halls

The challenges this year will be as long a family’s shopping list:

  • The traditional holiday peak converges with elevated online demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic. E-commerce sales will match or surpass brick-and-mortar. Consumers have multiple ordering channels to tap. E-commerce supply chain fulfillment and delivery operations need to respond to this decentralized − and unprecedented − demand-pull.
  • Many supply chains remain out of kilter, one of the pandemic’s many legacies. U.S. inventories are at their lowest levels in five years, according to several analysts. Stock-outs have been common throughout most of 2020. U.S. imports are spiking. However, those goods may not reach store shelves or distribution centers in time to satisfy peak consumption needs.

  • Parcel networks have been overwhelmed by demand since March. This has led to inconsistent delivery performance across the board. National and regional parcel carriers have maxed out their fulfillment and distribution infrastructures. Late deliveries mean that consumers will be forced to accept holiday service levels that are beneath their expectations. If there is good news, it’s that e-commerce consumers are aware of the problems and will be more tolerant of slower delivery. What they demand, and should expect, is access to real-time information about any service issues.
  • Consumers may order goods earlier than usual, allowing the supply chain to spread out delivery timetables to create a “load-leveling” effect. That would be positive news, but it should not automatically be counted upon. Amazon’s shift of its “Prime Day” program from July to mid-October could pull forward a fair amount of holiday activity.

  • Warehouse space is severely constrained. Amazon said several months ago it will need 50 percent more space to keep up with its projected holiday demand. Retailers with brick-and-mortar exposure need to position stores as “forward fulfillment” nodes. This allows orders to be pulled from store inventory and delivered over relatively short distances. Store networks will also support what is expected to be major demand spikes for in-store and curbside pickups of online orders. Pure-play e-tailers without store networks will need to get creative.
  • FedEx and UPS are levying meaningful peak surcharges on volumes from their largest customers. The U.S. Postal Service imposed the first peak surcharge in its history. Carriers say the fees are needed to offset their higher costs to serve. That is true, up to a point. Demands on delivery networks will be unprecedented, and carriers are pricing their services accordingly. Companies will have to consider this in their free shipping strategies to maintain profitability.

THE CLOCK IS TICKING

Is it too late for shippers and retailers to get their holiday house in order?

Not necessarily, but it will take fast action and deep planning. The challenges, as we’ve laid out, are immense. One key is to get ahead of the “demand curve.” When shippers gain visibility into end demand, they can prepare and execute a plan that enhances customer satisfaction and does so profitably. After all, meeting customer demands while losing money in the process is the hollowest of victories.

Managing the upstream channel is just as critical. Calibrating inventory flows with replenishment needs is a year-round challenge, and especially so during peak. The challenge is magnified this year with the headwind of COVID-19. Retailers need a clear line of sight into supplier production so they can forecast their inventory replenishment. In normal times, lack of visibility can lead to costly over-ordering to ensure adequate buffer stock. This season, however, over-ordering may be an adequate response, given how and where the inventory is positioned. 

During CSCMP’s EDGE 2020 Virtual Conference, Target Executive Vice President and Chief Supply Chain and Logistics Officer Arthur Valdez advised to “not be afraid to overreact.” That may sound counter-intuitive, but it can be an appropriate step during this peak. Target will be investing heavily in transportation services with a focus on improving delivery timing, Valdez said. Again, that appears to run against the grain as transport is considered a cost center. Yet it will be less costly than failing to execute deliveries because capacity is not available. A seasoned logistics partner can map out a strategy to leverage a customer’s existing assets, as well as to bring in outside capabilities that profitably meets customer demands.

This is especially important as shippers encounter an increasingly complex surcharge environment constructed by FedEx, UPS and, to a smaller degree, USPS and regional carriers.  High-volume FedEx and UPS customers could be looking at surcharges as high as $4 to $5 per piece. These are by far the most expensive surcharges we have ever seen. They can spell the difference between peak season success and failure, even if everything else breaks right. Any shipper expecting to tender significant traffic to either or both must be able to navigate those surcharges all within the framework of their logistics execution.

Amid the coming storm, it may be hard for folks to get a good fix on demand profiles beyond the holidays. But it pays to do so. For example, we may see another e-commerce surge early next year as fears of a combined COVID-seasonal flu cycle keep more consumers homebound. Already, we are seeing 2021 budget plans being adjusted to account for the lingering effect of COVID-19. We also expect similar peak season patterns for the next 3-5 years even after a coronavirus vaccine is approved and distributed. A strong logistics partner not only can help you get through 2020. It can prepare you for 2021, 2022, and beyond.

4 Tips: Improve Profitability Despite Rising Transportation Costs

Profitable shipping is a very attainable goal, even in today’s uncertain environment, where FedEx and UPS peak carrier surcharges have become a moving target for all parcel shippers. Despite these rising costs, there are ways all companies can improve shipping profitability in 2020. 

Try using these four tried-and-true tactics for improving shipping profitability in any market conditions. 

  1. Think at a Package Level
    If you’re handling multiple pick-and-pack orders, you need to know what you’re putting into different sized packages. Align that information with the actual transportation costs, and then figure out the profitability level on each. 

    This can be a complex process, but ultimately it is important to understand that the dollar amount on your transportation invoice does not tie into your product profitability. Once you determine what it costs to ship each SKU, it becomes clear that offering free shipping at a $50 order threshold, for instance, may not yield a profitable order for your company. 
  2. Use Good Margin Management
    When your marketing department launches a promotion – “Buy $50 worth of stuff and get free shipping” – make sure the “losers” do not fill-up e-commerce shopping cart and drive your cost above profit. To avoid these problems, share relevant information across your organization to keep everyone marching in the same direction. 

  1. Leverage Data 
    Look not only at carrier data, but also sales data, product costs, fulfillment costs, and other metrics that go into a single order. Transportation Insight helps shippers accumulate all of that information and consolidate it into a unified dashboard that is used to track trends, pinpoint winning/losing SKUs, and single out other areas where the company may be losing money.

  1. Partner with a Transportation Expert
    Work with a reliable logistics provider that has built out the necessary systems and that spreads the value of those systems across numerous different users. The latter allows providers to leverage economies of scale and offer their services at an affordable cost. This translates into high value for shippers in any business or economic condition. 

Protect Profit for Every Customer and Every Order

Our latest strategy guide “You Shipped It, But … Did it Make Money?” raises a question that is on the minds of many business leaders. 

Your business has responded to significant shifts in consumer buying behaviors and your customers expectations are being met. But did the transaction yield profit for the business? Or did transportation cost complexity eclipse your margin in the rush to serve?

Open our guide on margin management for more strategies that will help you master your supply chain to protect profit for every order.

You Ramped Up E-Commerce Shipping for COVID…Now What?

The effort didn’t go unnoticed. 

Comparing year-over-year e-commerce sales, DigitalCommerce360 says volume was up 76% in June. And while that increase leveled off at 55% for July 2020, e-commerce sales are still up 55% year-over-year for the first seven months of the year. 

Retailers are driving much of that growth as many completely changed their distribution models (either permanently or temporarily) away from brick-and-mortar and over to alternative online fulfillment strategies. Already underway pre-pandemic, the movement to sell more online accelerated rapidly once B2B and B2C customers started placing more orders from their laptops and mobile devices. 

Reacting quickly to an event that hit fast, hard and unexpectedly, companies made e-commerce shipping decisions based on a desperate need to stay in business. As a result, those decisions do not always include a complete analysis of the true cost of shipping those goods to customers. As added costs emerge, including peak parcel surcharges from UPS and FedEx, the true cost picture becomes blurry. 

It’s time for a thorough assessment of exactly what your COVID-related e-commerce strategy is costing your company.

Take a Step Back, Assess E-Commerce Costs

As you continue to hone your business model to accommodate e-commerce growth and changing customer demands, it is time to take a step back and truly assess the costs associated with these models. 

Many of these companies will continue handling more e-commerce volume than they did pre-COVID (even with their physical stores opening again). Managing both sides of the equation profitably requires a thorough investigation of the true cost of shipping and a strategy that factors in customers’ needs with organizational profitability. 

Companies should also weed out their “losing” SKUs, assess shipping costs right down to the package level, practice good margin management across the entire organization, utilize data for good decision-making, and work with a reputable logistics partner. 

Master E-Commerce Shipping, Master Order Profitability

Continue shipping products without closely examining the time, effort and money that goes into sending out each package and you will soon find yourself underwater. As pandemic pushed e-commerce sales and residential orders to new heights, was your organization among those that raced into reactive mode?

Do you know the true cost of your e-commerce shipping decisions? You can not afford to ignore this problem.

To help you master your response to online demand, our Supply Chain Masters created “You Shipped It, but … Did It Make Money?” Read today and access strategies to protect profitability for every order and every customer.

Peak Season Surcharges: 4 Things to Know

Less predictable, peak surcharges are creating additional complexity for parcel pricing, especially as UPS announces its holiday peak season surcharges. These new charges come in addition to similar costs in place the past few months.

For example, a parcel carrier may announce a general rate increase of 4.9%, but this is an average taken across all services, weight breaks, and zones. In reality, many rate increases are above 6% when applied to a shipper’s actual volume. 

Predictable by nature, these annual increases are usually baked into the “cost of doing business” for shippers, many of which understand that the GRI impact on their transportation rates is at least an increase of about 5% annually. 

Now, carriers are introducing accessorial surcharges at different times throughout the year in response to seasonal demand swings and business peaks. These unexpected peak season surcharges can be difficult to manage, especially during a global pandemic when dynamic shifts are occurring across the marketplace. 

Here are four things all shippers should know about peak season surcharges in 2020.

  1. Peak Season Surcharges Becoming Routine It pays to stay on top of these variations and respond accordingly. Companies that take proactive measures to offset pending surcharges are often best positioned to maintain profitability, protect their bottom lines, and keep their customers happy (and coming back for more).

    Alongside existing peak surcharges implemented earlier in 2020, UPS announced it will increase surcharges for the holiday season. Starting Nov. 15, surcharges on Ground, SurePost and domestic Air services will increase to between $1 and $4 per package, depending on the shippers’ parcel volume. At a minimum, that triples the increases implemented May 31. 
  2. Parcel Carriers Felt the COVID-19 Impact During the traditional holiday season, UPS and FedEx often start hiring up to six months ahead of time. They also require larger shippers to provide volume estimates to support capacity planning. Staffed and trained, the carriers position everyone for success during the busiest time of the year. 

    These proactive moves weren’t possible during the global pandemic, and that’s precisely why the surcharges surfaced quickly in 2020.
  3. Residential Deliveries Bear the Brunt of COVID Surcharges Surcharges surfaced quickly in 2020, with higher costs on residential deliveries and large package shipments to homes and businesses quickly consuming the carriers’ margins. In response, UPS and FedEx implemented peak surcharges for U.S. domestic residential shipments and large/oversize packages due to the increased demand. UPS implemented the new charges on May 31, and FedEx quickly followed on June 8. 

    Not all shippers were caught in this particular surcharge web. Some charges solely affected large shippers with significant increases in residential deliveries compared to their average pre-pandemic weekly volume from Feb. 2 and Feb. 29, 2020.
  4. Advance Peak Season Surcharge Planning Isn’t Easy Budget planning for surcharges isn’t easy in an environment where these increases can arise unexpectedly. No one was prepared for the massive impacts of COVID-19, for example, so shippers had little (or no) time to prepare in advance for the surcharges. 

    The good news is that even though individual companies can’t control parcel carriers’ surcharges, they can minimize the budgetary impact with accurate shipping data, experienced logistics partners, and quick responses to carrier announcements. 

Avoid Peak Season Surcharge Shock

As you plan your transportation spend for the remainder of 2020 and into 2021, be sure to factor in the reality of “unexpected” carrier surcharges. It doesn’t take a global pandemic to create peak season pressure on carriers’ profitability and spur added fees on your parcel shipments. At the same time, in the wake of COVID-19, expect significant changes in the last-mile delivery environment, especially in terms of pricing complexity.

Individually, a 30-cent surcharge on a residential parcel shipment may seem innocuous. Multiply that fee across thousands of packages, and it’s clear just how burdensome this unexpected fee can be to a company’s bottom line. 

Remember the proverb: forewarned is forearmed. Prior knowledge of a potential issue will always give you a tactical advantage.

To help you avoid surcharge surprises, we created “Manage the Surge: Avoid Surcharge Shocks, Power Performance.” It explores the how and why behind parcel carriers’ cost-recovery tactics. Read it today for the strategies you need to power a parcel program response that offsets these costs and protects your profit.

Indirect: Expert Insight Helps Manage Fluctuating Supply Costs

With economic volatility expected to continue through the remainder of 2020, understanding how these added costs affect your indirect spend management can support your efforts to control line item expenses that don’t often receive close scrutiny until budget season.

Although corrugated linerboard prices are holding steady, anticipated cost increases in polyethylene products create new profitability challenges. In this environment, a partner with group purchasing power and expert industry insight delivers quantifiable value through strong contract pricing and keen awareness of the alternative solutions that improve cost management compared to traditional buying habits.

Here’s a look at some of the manufacturing trends that are affecting the availability and cost of supplies you require to operate your business efficiently and effectively.

Manufacturing Activity Grew in June

Economic activity in the manufacturing sector grew in June, according to the Institute of Supply Management. The Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) increased 9.5 percent to 52.6, reflecting an expansion in the overall economy for the second straight month after April contraction ended 133 straight months of growth.

The New Orders Index jumped significantly to 56.4, up 26.4 percent from May. The Production Index registered 57.3 in June, an increase of 24.1 percent from May. 

Of the 18 industries that participated in the ISM monthly survey, 13 reported growth. 

With that growth has come increases in the ISM Price Index which rose to 51.3 in June, an increase of 10 percent over prior month.

  • Caustic soda, copper, crude oil, personal protection equipment supplies and steel all reported increases in price.
  • Methanol, packaging materials and plastic products all reported price declines.
  • Of 18 industries surveyed, three reported higher prices, 12 reported no price change, and only three reported lower prices.

Looking more broadly at the economic impacts of COVID-19 in the first half of 2020, the U.S. Real Gross Domestic Product decreased at an annual rate of 5 percent for the first quarter. That decrease reflects negative contributions from:

  • Personal consumption expenditures
  • Private inventory investment
  • Non-residential fixed investment
  • Exports

Those negative GDP contributions were partially offset by contributions from:

  • Residential fixed investment
  • Government spending
  • Imports

Meanwhile, U.S. unemployment dropped to 11.1 percent in June, reflecting an improvement of 3.2 million people removed from the jobless count. For manufacturing, ISM’s Employment Index registered 42.1, an improvement of 10 percent compared to May.

Linerboard Pricing Steady, Other Packaging Costs Volatile

Containerboard production continues to increase, supporting steady pricing throughout the first half of the year. In May, that increase was just 1 percent, month over month, but the uptick in production reflects a 6 percent increase year over year. 

Corrugated pricing for June is at $715 per ton. Industry analysts predict any anticipated cost reductions will fall short as demand has remained stronger than expected. Additional capacity of containerboard grades has been delayed. This means a previously projected decrease of $30 per ton is not expected to be realized in the market. 

Meanwhile, Old Corrugated Containers (OCC) pricing jumped dramatically during the global pandemic, up 196 percent in April compared to January 2020 levels.

Sales for both Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) and Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) are up through April compared to prior year. Domestic sales for LLDPE are up 2.3 percent, while LDPE sales are up 6.7 percent.

In response, producers have cut production to control inventory levels, as indicated by LDPE operating rates at 89.3 percent in April and LLDPE operating rates at 92 percent.

LLDPE large buyer contract prices bounced around during the first half of 2020, but have settled approximately 5 percent below the levels we saw at the end of 2019. Expect those contract prices to average 55 cents per pound in the third quarter of 2020.

At the same time, expect an increase of about 4 cents per pound for all grades of polyethylene resins. These increases are driven largely by efforts to control inventory levels, improvements in domestic demand and higher oil prices.

All major manufacturers have already sent increase notifications. Among these, stretch film producers announced a 6 percent increase in costs.

Control Indirect Supply Costs with an Expert Partner

Indirect supply management is a tool available to your team to find the essential items you need at reasonable prices. By working with a partner in this space, your company can consolidate its overall supply space and form strategic partnerships on items you regularly need.

Our partnerships are unique because we can put all your indirect supply needs together in a group purchasing model, which allows us to drive savings for you.

No matter how you are sourcing your products today, it can be improved through consolidation and smart partnerships. As you set your plans for the rest of 2020 and into 2021, now is the time to look at your accounts payable data and get a spend analysis to map out how you can get even greater efficiency around your indirect materials operation.

Transportation Insight is your partner in driving success now and into the future. Let’s start a conversation today about how we can drive savings for your company together.

From NAFTA to USMCA: All Trade Agreements Are Not Created Equal

Furthermore, many companies focused on overcoming operational challenges of the pandemic have been able to delay response to a regulatory action that’s been outside the spotlight.

Until now.

On July 1, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) replaces the existing requirements of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), with an exception for certain automotive products that will have a three-year transitional period. Many elements of NAFTA were retained in the new agreement; however, there are distinctions in the USMCA that require review and consideration by trade participants to ensure they effectively manage compliance during this program transition. According to a recent survey, there appears to be some confusion among supply chain managers on how to implement these changes and mitigate non-compliance risk to maintain company profitability.

Importers’ goods that qualified under NAFTA may also be eligible for USMCA; however, there are subtle changes that may impact those determinations. USMCA due diligence should be conducted by all trade participants as a demonstration of compliance, for all companies participating in North American trade between the United States, Mexico and/or Canada.

5 Differences Between NAFTA and USMCA

  1. Importers will no longer be required to complete a formal NAFTA certification document. A certificate of origin may now be completed based on information provided by the producer. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is not mandating a standard format for certificates of origin as long as they contain all of the required data elements. A best practice is to have the certification in hand before making a claim. Previous NAFTA certificates and certification documentation under USMCA must be kept for a minimum of five years.
  2. The de minimis threshold increases. NAFTA’s threshold of 7 percent for FOB value increases under USMCA to 10 percent. The de minimis for textiles and apparel is different.
  3. The terms of the USMCA will remain in effect for 16 years, after which time the parties can choose to revisit and/or renegotiate those terms, or withdraw from the agreement altogether. The agreement is also subject to a review every six years, at which point the United States, Mexico, and Canada can decide whether or not to extend the agreement if they feel doing so would be beneficial.
  4. Merchandise Process Fee (MPF) refunds will not be made on post-importation claims. An importer who fails to claim preferential tariff treatment at the time of entry will not be able to recoup their MPF through a post-summary correction or reconciliation later.
  5. Changes were made to the Rule of Origin for various goods (e.g., manufactured goods, pharmaceuticals, healthcare products, textiles and apparel, agricultural goods, etc.). However there are significant changes within the automotive sector concerning eligibility based on regional value content. In general, USMCA now requires the total North American-based content of a vehicle to equal 75 percent (up from 62.5 percent). USMCA also requires that 70 percent of a vehicle’s steel and aluminum must originate in North America.

How should importers prepare for the USMCA transition to ensure compliance?

Importers should carefully review their imported goods to ensure they understand the new rules of origin and can verify that they qualify under the new agreement. Binding rulings that determine parameters of origin determination under NAFTA will be invalid, and a new binding ruling will be required for USMCA.

We also recommend performing a comprehensive review of imported goods through internal or external compliance means to demonstrate USMCA Compliance due diligence. For example, there may be cases where goods did not qualify under the terms of NAFTA but may now qualify under USMCA.

And above all else, it is imperative that importers maintain a proper record-keeping system. This means you must document where all of your goods originate, and you must have on file a detailed description of your sourcing, production and determination process that clearly defines that the goods qualify.

Our Experience is Your Compass

It is a grave error for importers to assume their goods qualify under USMCA, even if they were NAFTA eligible.

To help guide you through the necessary process to determine whether or not your products do meet USMCA rules, Transportation Insight’s team of international compliance consultants are ready to help you outline and execute a personalized scope of work plan to ensure your USMCA program is in full compliance.

While your focus today on maximum supply chain efficiency can improve your ability to meet arising market demands, a partner with expertise in international trade compliance brings you peace of mind – and so much more. We take over the work of helping you navigate through the change from NAFTA to USMCA so you can progress toward global supply chain mastery.

Make sure your trade compliance processes are updated to protect your business financial risk that emerges during the implementation of complex new regulations. Contact one of our global trade compliance experts today for a free consultation.

The Relativity of the Supply Web


This fundamental truth applies to many aspects of our lives, including how we run our business. It’s a question that logistics managers and technology teams will have to consider when they think about their transformation from a single-direction supply chain to a multi-direction supply web. Does your team have the time to build out a technology suite of value? Or does partnership allow us to save time to focus on what’s best, and drive long-lasting change.

It may come as no surprise that the time you save through partnership may be the most valuable investment of all.

Technology: The Core of Supply Web Change

For manufacturers and distributors, the question on transforming into the supply web comes down to technology. If your current systems don’t provide a deep look into how your supply chain operates, then you could be losing out on data that could provide insight and identify opportunities.

Your team isn’t the only ones struggling with these questions. A recent Gartner survey identified the overwhelming majority of supply chain executives said digital business software and advanced analytics/big data is key to their future business plan, making them a top priority for the remainder of 2020 and beyond.

While this is one of the top priorities for supply chain leaders in the future, the problem lies in building the solution. Creating a custom, in-house solution requires dedicated time and resources from your supply chain, shipping, and technology teams. Taking them away from their tasks means lost man-hours in fulfilling customer demands, which can result in an immediate loss your team cannot recuperate because the time to serve them is gone.

Meanwhile, customers expect their providers to have the technology to identify the most efficient and expedited processes to fulfill orders. If you don’t have that capability, they will go to the next source that does. Can you afford to lose orders because of a lack of supply chain transparency?

Finding Agility and Transparency Through Partnership

Agility in the supply chain is all about being able to react quickly to customer behaviors. Because e-commerce and direct ordering increases are part of our “new normal,” customers demand their packages get to their destinations faster and with full transparency.

There are two ways to achieve this audience demand. The first way is to work with partners who already have the supply chain technology you need to succeed leading to being a better partner to your component and supply chain partners through data sharing and expectation setting.

Your company is already good at providing your core products and services to your audience. Time and money should not be spent building systems that already exist – they should be spent serving your customers and helping them succeed. This is why you need an analytics and business intelligence partner who understands your business, and has both the technology and know-how across supply chains to develop the data and options you need to execute.

This is where a partner like Transportation Insight comes into play. With proven tools that give you the supply chain transparency you need to transition into a supply web, your team can get access to big data analytics and business intelligence tools sooner rather than later. This gives you end-to-end transparency which can help you identify new synergies within your web, including fewer internal touches before shipping, and the potential to drop-ship directly from suppliers.

With this information, your team can be a better partner to your domestic and foreign suppliers. With sales information, time-in-shipping data, and other key performance indicators, you can help predict when you will need to reorder supplies, track trends which can help drive production guidelines, and ultimately create a workflow that keeps your shelves stocked with the right items, and customers happy with the efficiencies of their orders.

Tying It All Together

As the supply chain transforms into the supply web, driving a durable information network will give you the agility and intelligence you need to meet your customer demands. By utilizing a partner to tie it all together, your team can get the insight and transparency you need to make the best decisions for business.

Now and into the future, Transportation Insight is here to help your business grow at the speed of commerce. Schedule a consultation today to learn how we have the tools and skills needed to save time and save money.