Strategic Supply Chain Planning 2021 | Beyond COVID

Companies are looking at diversifying their supply sources. Whether this means on-shoring, near-shoring or simply adding alternative regions to the existing base. This is not a quick proposition. Suppliers have to be located, certified and tested. Order patterns have to be established and inventory policies implemented. All of this takes data, analysts and time. Perhaps the most difficult part, managing change in your supply chain planning.

Whether you are a manufacturer, distributor or retailer you have to be able to support more direct consumer channels than you may have traditionally. This will involve better collaboration, inventory management and alternative fulfillment and transportation options. Again, this requires data, analysts and change management.

The companies that will lead the pack are the ones that recognize the permanency of the COVID changes on the horizon and establish long-term supply chain strategies to mitigate risk and guarantee products and service to the end customer.

Planning for Supply Chain Flex is Paramount

An exponential boom in e-commerce sales rapidly created significant congestion for last mile deliveries. The effect spilled across the entire supply chain. At distribution and fulfillment centers some shippers saw their small packages go unshipped due to volume caps implemented by parcel carriers. Elsewhere, LTL carriers facing heightened shipment volumes at their terminals delivered fluctuating service levels.

As a result, many companies examined how they complete final deliveries to their clients, a process that retail giants like Amazon have nearly mastered. More and more companies are shifting toward expedited service from either existing brick-and-mortar facilities or an adjusted network of distribution centers. Smaller, urban fulfillment centers added in certain areas can help skirt site-specific volume limits. More options make you less susceptible to geography-based capacity constraints.

But you must understand how those changes in network design affect cost and service performance. 

Through its ability to evolve a massive local network, Amazon proved to be among the most reliable carriers during the disruptions of 2020. Not everyone has the deep pockets to establish an Amazon-like network with large distribution centers and cross-dock strategies. 

However, you can determine where you can compete with that sprawling service network – and where you cannot. SKU rationalization, margin analysis of different channels and overall network design analysis can help businesses of any size understand where growth is occurring and where it is not. From there you can align your supply chain planning based on the demand patterns your business is experiencing.

Look Upstream to Determine Opportunity

With everything happening in the supply chain environment, it is important to get outside of your business and examine your network upstream to your suppliers. This provides insight in several important areas. 

Over the past 20 years companies have worked to reduce and remove inventory where possible, achieving the absolute least cost in the process. Today, you must balance inventory, determine which inventory is right, and even decide the right customers to serve. Understanding your processes, as well as those of your partners is integral to transportation cost management.

When your retail partner asks you to drop ship product to their customers, can you segment your inventory into the different physical channels to both serve those individual orders and continue filling regular store-level inventory needs?

How should your inventory model change as you move toward insourcing or reshoring? With longer lead times and growing landed costs emerging from foreign vendors, local suppliers allow you to manage a smaller inventory or direct ship to customers and, ultimately lower overall cost. Do you have the contingencies in place across your network of vendor partners to deploy local or regional sourcing in the event of ongoing disruption in Asia?

By stepping outside your own walls and understanding processes upstream and downstream – as well as their alternatives – you become a stronger partner, especially if you can offer your suppliers visibility into your own demand. Ultimately, that level of collaboration helps your partners plan better, improving efficiency and service to you in the process.

By helping customers understand their total value stream and deploying a lean-minded supply chain strategy consultation, we help them visualize how changes to their network can improve cost and service across their transportation environment.

Capacity for Change can Limit Improvement

Achieving flexibility in your supply chain requires both an ability to recognize when processes are not performing and a willingness to apply change. If you don’t change, nothing changes, and it became especially clear in 2020 that a lot of companies don’t know how to implement that change. 

Leadership has to want to change and improve, and it is important to understand that if you are not constantly problem-solving then you are going backwards. Smaller companies understand this especially well, but larger companies are often separated into silos and metrics conflict with day-to-day activity.

Are you willing to let your partners save you from yourself? If leadership is not willing to accept analysis and insight that supports change, then activity rarely changes until crisis occurs. And when that crisis occurs, without analysis to support process improvement, you may not be able to determine the right practices to change.

Performing that analysis is no easy task. A lot of smaller companies don’t have the skillsets or capacity to complete that data-driven look. Likewise, medium and large companies may dedicate people to monitor performance in different supply chain areas. They may not have the groups of people capable of not only understanding how to complete the analysis, but also problem solve. 

That is where Transportation Insight helps. We not only have the capacity to complete analysis of SKU-level performance, network design and alternative, contingency supply chain strategies. Importantly, we also teach your teams how problem solve, a skill that you can then pass along to others in the organization.   

Once we deploy a problem-solving mindset alongside analysis of your supply chain data, we can create a map of the transportation activities across your network and determine options for alleviating problem points that drive up your cost. By pairing those continuous improvement efforts with renewed network flexibility that eliminates the risk of disruption, Transportation Insight positions you for improved cost control and enhanced opportunities for growth. 

For more insight that will help support your supply chain strategy in 2021, download our latest industry forecast. Read the First Quarter ChainLink 2021 for a multi-modal look at the transportation trends that will affect your business in the year ahead.

Mitigating Parcel Delivery Challenges in a Post-Coronavirus World

Consumers are now using e-commerce as their primary channel to buy everything from groceries and small electronics to home appliances and even cars. Most of those items move through one of three parcel networks: FedEx, UPS, or the U.S. Postal Service. Because of the sheer amount of parcels being processed and handled across the United States, we’re seeing natural “log jam” points come alive, resulting in delayed delivery and dissatisfied customers.

With the challenges mounting, is it possible to mitigate issues and maintain customer satisfaction? It’s possible – but it’s critical for teams to work together and understanding the challenges currently in play.

UPS Experiences Backups In The Northeast

The Northeast region of the United States was heavily impacted by the spread of COVID-19, forcing major cities like Boston and New York to virtually shut down overnight. Although those cities are starting to open, there remains a major backlog of parcels waiting for sorting and delivery.

At one UPS facility in Rhode Island, at least 40 UPS trailers remain on the dock, waiting to be processed. The parcels in these trailers represent a substantial amount of packages, destined for many different destinations across the northeast. Potentially, that could reflect over tens of thousands of customers who are frustrated because the items they ordered are not being processed for delivery.

The northeast isn’t the only facility experiencing problems. In Tucson, Arizona, employees at one facility is expressing concern about an outbreak of COVID-19. The local union claims 36 employees tested positive for Coronavirus, while three have been hospitalized for COVID-19 symptoms. If this facility shuts down for cleaning and sterilization, it could also create problems for parcel delivery in the Southwest as well, including the major population centers of Los Angeles and Phoenix.

Trouble Continues for the U.S. Postal Service

Packages sent through the mail are also facing delay threats due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The U.S. Postal Service is chartered by the U.S. Congress to deliver first-class mail, and in 2019 they delivered over 143 billion pieces of mail to 160 million addresses across the country, including parcel delivery through Priority Mail and other products.

But the COVID-19 outbreak has forced massive changes in their structure and how they manage their workforce. According to data from the USPS, at least 60 postal workers have passed away due to COVID-19 complications, 2,400 have tested positive for Coronavirus, and 17,000 employees – or three percent of their workforce – were temporarily displaced on quarantine. While there’s no way to measure the human loss, the number of employees affected by this virus is forcing the Board of Governors to work up a plan to keep employees healthy despite a decline in profit.

The profit drop comes from a reduction in one of their most successful business areas: Direct mail advertising. At one point, direct mail advertising made up 23 percent of revenue for the Postal Service. As companies look to save money and find new ways to get in front of consumers, they are pulling away from pre-sorted and direct mail advertising, putting a major impact in the USPS budget. The future of the Postal Service is now in question, as they are experiencing both a cash and personnel crunch like never before.

Managing Difficulties and Driving Customer Satisfaction

Although the COVID-19 pandemic is creating challenges, it’s nothing that we cannot overcome. With a combination of actionable insight and sound decision making, it’s possible to still drive customer satisfaction by understanding and controlling the current situation.

To start, it may be useful to start a relationship with a secondary carrier. Opening a new door with a carrier can expand your options, especially when it comes to expedited parcel delivery. For example: although UPS has an expansive ground network, FedEx can offer more daily flight connections. Understanding the tradeoffs and opportunities give you an upper hand in determining how to ship parcels to consumers, and through what options.

From there, constant analysis of parcel delivery optimization can help you determine how effective your plans are, and how to improve them even further. Through service and compliance audits, you can find out how quickly your packages are moving, if they are moving within guaranteed service parameters, and if how many packages end up lost or damaged.

Finally, understanding the current parcel situation can help you mitigate and manage customer expectations. Expressing the potential problems and managing an understanding of when parcels may be delivered can help customers better plan for the issues, driving better loyalty in the end.

Bringing it All Together With a Trusted Partner

Navigating the parcel world in a post-Coronavirus world doesn’t have to be intimidating. The experts at Transportation Insight can help you identify change opportunities in your parcel delivery program, and lead to long-term success. Schedule a consultation with us today, and learn how our decades of experience can quickly improve your parcel program.

Parcel Volume Growth Spurs Retail Caps

Bound for a stay-at-home society quarantined under COVID-19 guidelines, a whipsaw in residential delivery parcel volume growth is a burden on small package carriers like FedEx and UPS which are accustomed to commercial service driving operational revenue.

In response to the dynamics of the current norm, service providers across the e-commerce supply chain are taking unprecedented steps to control their own financial performance while still delivering a satisfying shopping and delivery experience.

Effects of the COVID-19 disruption are still emerging, even as organizations work to pivot their processes to meet the needs of a post-pandemic supply chain. Shippers that understand how shifts in consumer demands manifest across small package networks can pivot their supply chain strategy to control costs, avoid risk and capitalize on opportunity.

Retail Sales Plunge During April

U.S. retail sales dropped 16.4 percent during April, the largest drop of its kind since 1992. The April decline doubled the previous record for one-month tumble in the sales indicator – set just a month prior during March’s 8.3 percent record drop.

While the U.S. Department of Commerce reports the sharpest dips for clothing, electronics and furniture stores, society’s continued migration toward the online sales platform accelerates.

Month over month, the online segment posted 8.4 percent growth in April as Americans shopped from home for an expanding diversity of products, from groceries to office supplies. Compared to last year, the changes in consumer behavior accelerated by COVID-19 has increased e-commerce sales 21.6 percent.

DHL, which provides local e-commerce delivery in major U.S. markets, reported volume increases of 36 percent compared to February numbers. Increase is sharpest in the Northeast, according to a release that also stated that an increase in e-commerce orders over the past five weeks has pushed DHL’s parcel volume to peak season levels.

As U.S. businesses begin reopening their doors, monitoring the evolution of consumer buying habits after COVID-19 will be an important piece in maintaining an optimal parcel shipping strategy. Will the U.S. embrace on-site shopping again, particularly in malls and other brick-and-mortar establishments? How much of your retail sales will continue to come through the e-commerce channel?

Whether your organization is an e-commerce legacy or you’re seizing new market share, serving online customers requires an expert understanding of the service implications on transportation costs. In the hurry to serve peaking customer demand, it is easy to lose sight of profitability at the order and item-level. Lacking that visibility could prevent you from capitalizing in growth areas emerging in the same environment as broader economic changes.

FedEx Limits Parcel Shipments for Kohl’s and Others

FedEx limited the number of items that about two dozen other retailers can ship from certain locations. Applied in certain geographies where volume is heaviest, the move comes as retailers across the nation have increasingly begin using closed storefronts to fulfill online orders.

For retailers, this alternative fulfillment strategy facilitates sales even when other conditions pre-empt an on-site purchase. When fulfillment alternatives are included in supply chain contingency planning, retailers can quickly pivot their network to serve parcel volume growth in emerging customer segments or specific geographies, and still maintain optimal transportation cost.

“These customers have seen significant volume growth since the spread of Covid-19,” FedEx said last week in a notice to its Ground workers reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. “In a time of already high volume growth, capping the number of packages to be picked up at these locations will limit any negative impacts to the FedEx Ground network.”

While retailers are able to keep inventory moving off shelves though online fulfillment, the volume increases in certain parts of the country have challenged FedEx facilities that were not prepared to handle a rapid increase. This is most prevalent along the East Coast and West Coast, particularly the Pacific Northwest, where the COVID-19 impacted has persisted the longest.

Customers initially affected by FedEx shipping limitations included: Kohl’s, Belk Inc., Neiman Marcus Group Inc. and Nordstrom Inc., retailers like Abercrombie & Fitch Co., Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. and Eddie Bauer, and other sellers like Groupon Inc. and Young Living Essential Oils LLC. The limits varied at each location.

In an environment when parcel carriers are limiting volumes, shippers can improve critical business decision making through on-demand access to dashboards that reveal real-time access to your order volume, historical transportation transactions, carrier volume requirements and accessorial trends. Increased visibility to these and other Key Performance Indicators can deliver improved cost management and increased awareness of cost-service trade-offs.

Supply Chain Master Can Map, Mitigate Risk During Parcel Volume Growth

Organizations that are re-calibrating their supply networks to address the weaknesses and opportunities emerging during COVID-19 can benefit significantly from the support of a supply chain expert.

Our unrivalled expertise gained across thousands of supply chains allows us to offer guidance when the way forward is unclear. We’re currently helping hundreds of clients assess their small package program to make sure they have the network in place to meet e-commerce delivery demand today and tomorrow. Deploying a best-in-class technology platform to gather, manage and analyze your parcel data, we provide evidence to support your go-forward strategies.

Leveraging this technology alongside deep parcel industry knowledge and multi-modal expertise, shippers can effectively identify any existing supply chain gaps impact performance and cost management.

To learn more about how we can map your strategies for e-commerce success in the face of supply chain disruption, talk to an expert today.

From Micro to Macro: The Effect of Social Distancing on the Supply Chain

In restaurants, they are moving tables and putting a hard maximum on the number of people allowed inside. Although the return of patrons generates badly needed revenue, moving tables apart means less diners, resulting in less money coming in the door. In order to maintain a peak level of performance, those restaurants need to turn tables and customers faster to achieve the same amount of revenue.

A similar concept will be introduced into the supply chain, as factories, warehouses and distribution centers come back online. Employees will need to consistently stay six feet apart, forcing managers to figure out how to keep up productivity while adhering to guidelines. Are you prepared for the change?

The Newest Constraint in the Supply Chain: Social Distancing

There are several supply chain constraints that most companies can plan around. These include capacity, throughput, and on occasion, emissions.

Using an Extended LEAN approach, managers and facilities are encouraged to reduce the amount of time and distance per process. This reduces waste throughout the production line, improving efficiency and ultimately providing more output with the resources already in place.

But due to social distancing, there’s a new constraint supply chain managers must deal with: the maximum amount of physical distance you can remove from production. Some of these situations are easier to plan for: Truck drivers can stay in their cabs, while using e-signatures for receipts.

Other conditions are going to be much more difficult to apply: In the interest of keeping employees healthy, they must consistently stay six feet apart. Companies now have to determine what that means for receiving, production and shipping. If employees have to maintain a safe distance, how does that affect their critical daily operations? Some companies say they are experiencing a 40 percent decrease in capacity due to the social distancing protocols.

Social Distancing Extends From the Facility and into the Network

The physical plant isn’t the only stakeholder affected by social distancing. The impact of lost production and capacity also extends to your logistics network.

If your output is slower due to social distancing, it can have a ripple effect on everything from loading trucks and time-in-transit to service guarantees. Capacity decreases mean it takes more time to load trucks and impedes trucks from moving freight from point-to-point. That cuts into your bottom line.

From there, the issues fall like dominoes. The late truck has more time on the dock, so your freight is arrives at its destination later. When it does, there could be a delivery failure due to a closed dock or a receiver bound by rules prohibiting deliveries outside a set window. Additionally, freight bills could increase because transportation providers are unwilling to wait a long time for freight loading and unloading. Your carrier partners might not be able to meet service times because of your approach to social distancing.

There are ways to approach this that will help your business move forward. Once the impact to individual facilities is determined, it’s possible to reconfigure your logistics network to meet the current capacity needs. Some of the options your team can explore include:

  • Do you need to reduce inbound material shipments until capacity can increase?
  • Should you adjust your outbound schedule to ensure you can maximize transit lanes?
  • Can your team or warehouse be more efficient in managing inbound and outbound freight?

Having a Partner to Help You Adjust for Social Distancing

It’s critically important to have a partner in your corner that not only understands how to configure logistics operations using tried and true techniques, but how to translate them to the broader supply network to balance cost, service and risk. While technology plays a key part into this transformation, these solutions need to be approached with a holistic solution in mind.

As we reopen facilities and plan for the “new normal” for the foreseeable future, it’s important to solve these problems now. Because we have no idea when social distancing practices will ease, the problems you face now won’t go away on their own. Instead, solving them will help you become a “shipper of choice” as activity ramps up. You can also maintain profitability and positively plan for the future.

In this race, Transportation Insight is your complete partner in success. Our technology tools allow you to decide between the best carriers and networking options.We can also help you drive success through supply chain mapping, optimization, and applied Extended LEAN strategies with social distancing in mind. Because we’ve worked through thousands of supply chains with hundreds of companies across industries, we know how to apply the best practices and wisdom around your current and future strategies.

Partnership matters – and Transportation Insight is prepared to help you now and well into the future. Contact us today to get started with a consultation on how your facility can manage productivity despite social distancing.

Serve Customers With a Personalized Supply Chain

Society’s sudden move to a shelter-in-place and work-from-home environment dramatically affected buying behaviors, and, in the process, expectations increased on companies responding to demand.

Organizations equipped with an agile, customer-centric supply chain network are capitalizing by evolving their service to the current environment. Distributors are re-locating inventory to meet emergent demand for products needed to support COVID-19 response in specific geographies. Retailers have kept Americans fed and working by adjusting online fulfillment strategies to utilize brick-and-mortar curbside pick-up or alternate home delivery methods. Manufacturers are drop-shipping products directly to homes to meet newfound interests in exercise.

As customer preferences carry even greater weight in modern supply network planning, the organizations with a holistic network view will deliver the most cost-effective shipping strategies that empower choice-conscious clients.

Customers Take Control

In 2016, parcel and express delivery volume bypassed railroads to become the second-largest transportation sector behind motor freight, according to the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals’ 28th Annual State of Logistics Report. With that leap, consumers seized control of logistics spending and “supply chain as we’ve known it” changed forever.

In the past, traditional retail strategies put the brand in control, using a push-based system with consumers at the end of the supply chain. Throughout the rest of the supply network, past experience drove inventory decisions, and product was pushed to stores based on what consumers “should” like and purchase.

Ongoing expansion of e-commerce has increasingly shifted decision-making for many organizations toward the customer experience. With the outbreak of COVID-19, historical buying behaviors are no longer valid and the consumer is in charge now more than ever. Companies that didn’t have a consumer-centric approach are adapting to survive.

Adopting a consumer-centric approach isn’t automatic, however. It requires thorough understanding of your customers’ preferences from point of purchase to final delivery.

Consumer Behaviors Changing Forever

While society has steadily shifted more buying to online platforms, COVID-19 sent more people online to buy a broader array of products than ever before.

In March, online grocery sales hit an all-time high. And in April, online grocery retailers topped that record by about 37%, according to survey data from grocery consultant Brick Meets Click (BMC) and research firm Symphony RetailAI.

Driving the sales growth was a 33.3% increase in the total number of orders: 62.5 million in April vs. 46.9 million in March. Spending per order grew more modestly, as did the number of online grocery shoppers.

Retailers like Wal-Mart and Target are reporting record online sales growth as well, giving further evidence that more buyers are turning to e-commerce sales channels for everyday needs. As the convenience of online buying appeals to a broader population, the need for diverse delivery options will increase, just as it has since parcel transportation took the No. 2 spot in logistics spend in 2016.

Effectively fulfilling those customer delivery demands requires a transportation strategy supported by multi-modal expertise and technology. Transportation management systems that integrate vital transportation information from freight and parcel service providers, along with historical shipping data, can offer a strong basis for decisions that improve customer service and protect bottom line profitability.

A Case for a Personalized Supply Chain

Organizations that can create a supply chain personalized to the expectations and behaviors of their customers can achieve greater brand loyalty. By allowing customers more control over their delivery experience, brands can create greater loyalty and improve customer retention.

At the same time, the shippers that establish a nimble network can rapidly respond to fluctuations in supply and demand and capitalize on opportunities for growth.

To learn more about creating a truly personalized supply chain that serves your customers’ needs, read Transportation Insight’s Guide to Mastering Your Supply Chain.

In it, we share more data about emerging customer trends as well as strategies and tactics to create a stronger supply chain that ultimately drives growth. Read it today to evolve your supply chain to meet your customers changing fulfillment and delivery needs.

Indirect Supply Management Matters in Today’s Environment

With certain supplies harder and more expensive to secure, how can manufacturers ensure operations continue on a level playing field? The answer lies in a company’s approach to indirect supply management.

Challenges Faced by MRO and Office Supplies Due to COVID-19

When you think about the MRO supply chain, it almost seems simple. Replacement parts and consumable supplies come up the chain and into your storage. When a piece needs to be replaced, it comes out of currently held stock. To ensure stock doesn’t run low, warehouse managers keep a recurring order open to ensure replacement and consumable items are available.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic changed everything. Many of the pieces we take for granted, like personal protective equipment, were immediately redirected to first responders who needed it more. Additionally, normal supply chains were disrupted because of shutdowns in China and companies utilizing a work-from-home model to prevent the spread of novel Coronavirus.

Protective equipment and replacement parts are only two of the potential shortages MRO operations faced by buyers of indirect supplies. The slowdown also extends to regular office supplies. As more people are forced to work from home, the demand for copier paper is dropping. As a result, two of the major paper producers in the United States have temporarily shut down at least three plants which produced office paper for printers and copy machines.

Although it appears that the supply chain may be in a crisis, your business doesn’t have to navigate these changes alone. By tapping into a group purchasing environment, sourcing MRO and office supplies doesn’t have to be an excruciating process.

Why Indirect Supply Management is a Critical Part of Your Business

There’s a lot of power in group purchasing. Groups who regularly order recurring supplies are able to get volume discounts and oftentimes improved availability for even the most in-demand supplies.

For example: A group of our indirect sourcing customers reached out to us to help secure face masks for their regular operations in breathing hazard environments, such as painting and other high-particle- producing environments. Our team quickly got to work on the request, and was able to find a source of high-quality face masks. After ensuring their quality control was to the clients’ standards, we secured orders at a competitive price with a quick delivery window, ensuring our clients’ businesses could continue to operate uninterrupted.

Indirect supply management is a tool available to your team to find the essential items you need at reasonable prices. By working with a partner in this space, your company can consolidate their overall supply space and form strategic partnerships on items they will regularly need. What makes our partnerships unique is that we can put it all together in a group purchasing model, which allows us to drive savings for our partners.

When you combine indirect supply management with other disciplines, like LEAN management, your company can actualize savings in multiple ways. By focusing on reducing waste and improving efficiency, the supplies your company relies on can be utilized smarter. While this drives cost savings at the core, it also gives your team a mindset of constant improvement, which benefits your entire organization through new thinking and problem solving skills.

Get Support from the Leaders in Indirect Supply Management

No matter how you are sourcing your products today, it can be improved through consolidation and smart partnerships. As you set your plans towards the next phase of your business, now is the time to look at your accounts payable data and get a spend analysis to map out how you can get even greater efficiency around your indirect materials operation.

Transportation Insight is your partner in driving success now and into the future. Let’s start a conversation today about how we can drive savings for your company together.

Monitor, Pivot, Perform: Strategies for Unexpected Parcel Delivery Peaks

However, unlike the seasonal Black Friday and Prime Day spikes many shippers and carriers have mastered, the current parcel climate is yielding new challenges.

Home-bound customers aren’t answering the door for signature-seeking parcel delivery couriers. How does the FedEx and UPS driver complete deliveries at closed businesses? When parcel trucks are loaded to the roof and more e-commerce orders are filling the pipeline, essential supply shipments cannot stop and impede consumers’ medical, home office and home school needs.

During this non-standard peak period, communication is critical between shippers, carriers and customers. As the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation evolves across North America, an organization’s proactive efforts to monitor, validate and optimize its small package program can improve efficiencies, maintain customer service and control costs.

Parcel Volume is Filling Networks

Limitations on passenger travel across international borders isn’t slowing the movement of goods into the U.S. Air cargo flights enter the country daily, and the express market is working as usual. Essential goods – medical, protective and cleaning supplies – are getting priority over non-traditional retail shipments, but Amazon’s move to add workers illustrates that fulfillment and service providers are focused on meeting the rising online demand for vital needs.

“UPS’s network planning and operations teams are experienced with adapting to changing conditions, and are developing contingency plans to address potential sources of disruption in our air and ground networks,” UPS Chairman and CEO David Abney said in a March 18 email to the marketplace. “Our teams are working to continue to serve the supply chain needs of businesses during this time, while keeping our employees and customers safe.”

Like organizations around the globe, carriers are focused on good hygiene within facilities and among employees, but they’re also focused on maintaining their own efficient operations. Packages destined for a location that is closed under nine days, will be held at the UPS/FedEx centers. However, if the delivery location is closed more than nine days, they are returning to the shipper.

The central issue here becomes two-fold:

  • Carriers don’t have storage for these packages. Many held packages are being stored in feeder units (trucks) and stay there until unloaded for scheduled delivery. If an urgent package needs delivery, shippers will likely have to resend product. 
  • If drivers are unable to deliver a package due to time constraints or buildings are closed, they are instructed to mark them “Emergency Conditions – COVID-19.” All of those packages will circumvent guaranteed service refunds.

Meanwhile, UPS and FedEx are easing requirements for physical signatures, and offering alternatives to customers meeting a driver at the door. For deliveries to high-density buildings closed to outside traffic, such as apartment complexes, service to lockboxes or other alternative pick-up points may become increasingly prevalent.

In this environment, it is important that shippers closely monitor and validate parcel service performance, especially within carriers’ complicated accessorial structures. Interior deliveries may not be feasible. Heavy weight packages, such as reams of paper for the home office, will generate additional costs. Be alert for carrier adjustments to rates and services during this non-standard peak period.

Nuances related to parcel delivery services can create new challenges for commercial shippers accustomed to operating in a business-to-business world. Responding to direct-to-consumer delivery demands can trigger unfamiliar shipping cost assessments. An experienced shipping provider can help implement drop-shipping programs that balance cost and service for shippers responding to home-bound consumers. That partner’s ability to monitor transportation activity also supports shippers’ proactive communication of delivery status or delays to end customers.

Monitor Fluctuations in Spend and Volume

Our team has spoken with customers experiencing a spike in online orders stemming from people staying home to reduce the risk of infection. As spread of the virus evolves, employee absence could jeopardize their ability to fulfill orders. Curtailment of non-essential shipments could further impact some organizations’ shipping volume.

It is important to actively monitor carrier spend levels to protect volume-based discount incentives. Earned discount thresholds offered in parcel carrier agreements are based on a 52-week rolling average. In the event of a slowdown, as new weeks of data are incorporated, the gross rolling average will decline and discount incentives will adjust downward.

For FedEx customers, this often results in an incremental change. The change for UPS customers could be more stark as a shipper’s spend levels diminish over time.

As the transportation environment continues to shift, it may make sense for some small package shippers to consider evaluating low-weight, multi-piece LTL shipments. Where warranted, transitioning those shipments to UPS Hundredweight or FedEx Multiweight can help drive revenue calculations.

If your company’s fluctuating parcel spend jeopardizes discount incentives, now is the time to have an honest conversation with account managers about the current situation, or consider exploring other carrier options. This can spur broader conversations that support improved cost management, including routing guides for outbound volume or billing practices that put cost control in your hands instead of your vendor partner.

Experienced parcel shippers can manage these program practices in-house. However, at a time when operational demands challenge many companies’ profitable performance, multi-modal transportation management experts using technology-enabled analysis can support parcel shipping optimization that enhances service and controls costs.

Parcel logistics leaders: Now more than ever it is important to make sure you get the best carrier rates possible. Companies pursuing peak fulfillment opportunities can leverage this non-standard peak season to their benefit while protecting customer experience.

Long-term Parcel Outlook

Don’t trust any crystal ball hype that you’re hearing in the marketplace. Nobody can predict what is happening tomorrow, next week or over the long-term. One thing is certain: there will be change.

This creates new opportunities to examine end-to-end organizational processes.

Digital transformation in recent years laid groundwork for the supply chain evolution many organizations are already embracing. Sourcing strategies, vendor locations and distribution network design are key elements in executives’ active conversations during this time of disruption. The prospect of financial incentives will drive more companies to diversify and reshore domestic production.

Transportation Insight manages supply chains for organizations of all sizes so they can focus on areas of their own expertise. Combining parcel invoice audit and payment, data management and analysis with decades of deep parcel industry experience, we help clients align their multi-modal transportation programs with carrier capabilities and customer demands.

In a dynamic, unpredictable marketplace, we’re here to lead you through efforts to adapt your current strategy, construct contingency plans for future disruptions and monitor your carriers performance. To make sure your small package shipping processes are delivering maximum value when it is needed most, schedule a parcel program assessment today.