Holiday Shipping: Will Your Parcels be Picked Up and Delivered on Time?

Days after “Black Friday” UPS put holiday shipping restrictions on Nike and Gap and directed drivers to stop Cyber Monday pick-ups at other large retailers that are already exceeding parcel volume forecasts through booming online sales.  

In a year marked by a pandemic-driven shift in consumer buying habits that has driven consecutive quarters of record e-commerce growth, parcel networks have been at or near capacity for months. An unprecedented holiday peak has been on the radar, but as expected, early promotions and efforts to bring parcel volume forward could never be enough.

And in the midst of a monumental peak period, the parcel carriers continue to adjust their strategy to not only drive revenue growth in high demand e-commerce service areas, but also protect volume and achieve competitive advantage as Amazon’s delivery networks continue to evolve. 

Let’s look at some of the latest developments in the parcel shipping environment. They may affect your ability to delight customers this holiday season.

E-Commerce Bloats Holiday Shipping Volume Beyond Capacity

Demand for the 2020 holiday peak shipping season is forecast to exceed 86 million packages a day – about 7 million packages outside current parcel network capacity. These estimates are validated by the National Retail Federation’s estimate that online shopping increased 44 percent during a five-day stretch that included Black Friday and Cyber Monday. 

Both UPS and FedEx prepared retail shippers for tight holiday shipping capacity, issuing advice for holiday shippers and encouraging clients to “shop earlier than ever with special offers or other incentives.” Yet, before December even dawned, both carriers were enforcing volume agreements and applying peak season charges and accessorial fees that create additional order fulfillment cost for shippers. 

In this environment it is critical that you have real-time understanding of your parcel shipping activity. While volume outside agreed-upon levels or historical averages may result in added cost during other parts of the year (as it did with COVID peak surcharges), packages exceeding a shipper’s determined space simply will not be served – at least until additional capacity becomes available.

Shipping Delays: Expect, Forewarn and Facilitate

Based on the recent trends observed, the average package delay rate during the 2020 holiday season may range between 14 percent and 18 percent. Consumers in densely populated cities can expect delays as high as 25 percent to 30 percent. 

Unless you create an expectation of delayed delivery, this can be a real problem for customer experience. Proactive communication with your customers about anticipated delays is one of the most important steps in preserving holiday shipping experience.  Use your website and email communications to help set expectations. 

That said, as consumers’ expectations on speed evolve, we are seeing an increased willingness to wait for a delivery, especially if it means free shipping. According to BoxPoll, more than half of consumers opting for free shipping (57 percent) considered five-day delivery to be “fast” – that’s up 8 percentage points compared to last year. One-third of respondents in the weekly survey said that seven-day delivery is “acceptable” at minimum.

Retailers are positioned to capitalize when they maintain awareness of shipping characteristics, alternative service models and, of course, their customers’ expectations. A “no-rush” option is a familiar part of the Amazon order process, and now other brands are following suit, even offering incentives for delayed or “slow service.” If a consumer considers five-day service “fast,” are you driving up cost by offering more service then they need?

FedEx Counters Amazon’s E-Commerce and Logistics Buildout

The FedEx acquisition of ShopRunner complements the actions that we have seen FedEx taking to remain relevant in e-commerce as Amazon continues to strengthen its logistics and fulfillment capabilities.  

The move reinforces the FedEx position as the anti-Amazon solution for companies seeking an Amazon alternative. Some of the carrier’s other recent activity following the same strategy includes:

  • Acquisition of GENCO to form the basis of Fulfillment by FedEx
  • Moving to a seven-day-a-week delivery schedule
  • Severing ties with Amazon for delivery to focus on other e-commerce volume
  • Pulling SmartPost deliveries into the Home Delivery network to bolster density and profitability.

With the global parcel market positioned to more than double by 2026, fueled by e-commerce growth and further accelerated by COVID-19, both FedEx and UPS will need to continue adding value to retailers’ unichannel solutions to keep volume when Amazon opens their delivery network to third party shipments. Amazon suspended its delivery service earlier this year due to the pandemic, but it is expected to reopen in the near future.

Of course, the parcel carriers are among an ever-growing contingent of organizations devising new strategies to compete with Amazon. Just in time for the holidays, WalMart is dropping the $35 minimum on free shipping for e-commerce purchases of electronics, toys and clothing made for participants in its WalMart+ membership program. The move – and the program – are both designed to compete with Amazon Prime.

Are You Positioned to Compete?

Make sure your holiday shipping success is not eclipsed by transportation costs.

Can you quickly determine how your parcel shipping volume falls within your capacity agreement with your carriers? Do you know how quickly your customers are getting their orders – and whether you are meeting your delivery commitments? Can you determine which SKUs are making money – and which are not?

Ongoing awareness of evolving trends in the parcel environment – from service disruptions to capacity shortages – is integral to your ability to pivot your small package shipping strategy. 

Understanding how those trends affect your transportation cost and service to end customers requires expert analysis and actionable intelligence. The latest enhancements to our technology platform puts the power of that information at your fingertips with best-in-class visualization of data gathered across your entire supply chain.

Schedule a demonstration today to see how our clients are able to identify business trends, understand the impact of cost and service on working capital, and recognize ongoing performance improvement opportunities.

You Ramped Up E-Commerce Shipping for COVID…Now What?

The effort didn’t go unnoticed. 

Comparing year-over-year e-commerce sales, DigitalCommerce360 says volume was up 76% in June. And while that increase leveled off at 55% for July 2020, e-commerce sales are still up 55% year-over-year for the first seven months of the year. 

Retailers are driving much of that growth as many completely changed their distribution models (either permanently or temporarily) away from brick-and-mortar and over to alternative online fulfillment strategies. Already underway pre-pandemic, the movement to sell more online accelerated rapidly once B2B and B2C customers started placing more orders from their laptops and mobile devices. 

Reacting quickly to an event that hit fast, hard and unexpectedly, companies made e-commerce shipping decisions based on a desperate need to stay in business. As a result, those decisions do not always include a complete analysis of the true cost of shipping those goods to customers. As added costs emerge, including peak parcel surcharges from UPS and FedEx, the true cost picture becomes blurry. 

It’s time for a thorough assessment of exactly what your COVID-related e-commerce strategy is costing your company.

Take a Step Back, Assess E-Commerce Costs

As you continue to hone your business model to accommodate e-commerce growth and changing customer demands, it is time to take a step back and truly assess the costs associated with these models. 

Many of these companies will continue handling more e-commerce volume than they did pre-COVID (even with their physical stores opening again). Managing both sides of the equation profitably requires a thorough investigation of the true cost of shipping and a strategy that factors in customers’ needs with organizational profitability. 

Companies should also weed out their “losing” SKUs, assess shipping costs right down to the package level, practice good margin management across the entire organization, utilize data for good decision-making, and work with a reputable logistics partner. 

Master E-Commerce Shipping, Master Order Profitability

Continue shipping products without closely examining the time, effort and money that goes into sending out each package and you will soon find yourself underwater. As pandemic pushed e-commerce sales and residential orders to new heights, was your organization among those that raced into reactive mode?

Do you know the true cost of your e-commerce shipping decisions? You can not afford to ignore this problem.

To help you master your response to online demand, our Supply Chain Masters created “You Shipped It, but … Did It Make Money?” Read today and access strategies to protect profitability for every order and every customer.

Monitor, Pivot, Perform: Strategies for Unexpected Parcel Delivery Peaks

However, unlike the seasonal Black Friday and Prime Day spikes many shippers and carriers have mastered, the current parcel climate is yielding new challenges.

Home-bound customers aren’t answering the door for signature-seeking parcel delivery couriers. How does the FedEx and UPS driver complete deliveries at closed businesses? When parcel trucks are loaded to the roof and more e-commerce orders are filling the pipeline, essential supply shipments cannot stop and impede consumers’ medical, home office and home school needs.

During this non-standard peak period, communication is critical between shippers, carriers and customers. As the novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation evolves across North America, an organization’s proactive efforts to monitor, validate and optimize its small package program can improve efficiencies, maintain customer service and control costs.

Parcel Volume is Filling Networks

Limitations on passenger travel across international borders isn’t slowing the movement of goods into the U.S. Air cargo flights enter the country daily, and the express market is working as usual. Essential goods – medical, protective and cleaning supplies – are getting priority over non-traditional retail shipments, but Amazon’s move to add workers illustrates that fulfillment and service providers are focused on meeting the rising online demand for vital needs.

“UPS’s network planning and operations teams are experienced with adapting to changing conditions, and are developing contingency plans to address potential sources of disruption in our air and ground networks,” UPS Chairman and CEO David Abney said in a March 18 email to the marketplace. “Our teams are working to continue to serve the supply chain needs of businesses during this time, while keeping our employees and customers safe.”

Like organizations around the globe, carriers are focused on good hygiene within facilities and among employees, but they’re also focused on maintaining their own efficient operations. Packages destined for a location that is closed under nine days, will be held at the UPS/FedEx centers. However, if the delivery location is closed more than nine days, they are returning to the shipper.

The central issue here becomes two-fold:

  • Carriers don’t have storage for these packages. Many held packages are being stored in feeder units (trucks) and stay there until unloaded for scheduled delivery. If an urgent package needs delivery, shippers will likely have to resend product. 
  • If drivers are unable to deliver a package due to time constraints or buildings are closed, they are instructed to mark them “Emergency Conditions – COVID-19.” All of those packages will circumvent guaranteed service refunds.

Meanwhile, UPS and FedEx are easing requirements for physical signatures, and offering alternatives to customers meeting a driver at the door. For deliveries to high-density buildings closed to outside traffic, such as apartment complexes, service to lockboxes or other alternative pick-up points may become increasingly prevalent.

In this environment, it is important that shippers closely monitor and validate parcel service performance, especially within carriers’ complicated accessorial structures. Interior deliveries may not be feasible. Heavy weight packages, such as reams of paper for the home office, will generate additional costs. Be alert for carrier adjustments to rates and services during this non-standard peak period.

Nuances related to parcel delivery services can create new challenges for commercial shippers accustomed to operating in a business-to-business world. Responding to direct-to-consumer delivery demands can trigger unfamiliar shipping cost assessments. An experienced shipping provider can help implement drop-shipping programs that balance cost and service for shippers responding to home-bound consumers. That partner’s ability to monitor transportation activity also supports shippers’ proactive communication of delivery status or delays to end customers.

Monitor Fluctuations in Spend and Volume

Our team has spoken with customers experiencing a spike in online orders stemming from people staying home to reduce the risk of infection. As spread of the virus evolves, employee absence could jeopardize their ability to fulfill orders. Curtailment of non-essential shipments could further impact some organizations’ shipping volume.

It is important to actively monitor carrier spend levels to protect volume-based discount incentives. Earned discount thresholds offered in parcel carrier agreements are based on a 52-week rolling average. In the event of a slowdown, as new weeks of data are incorporated, the gross rolling average will decline and discount incentives will adjust downward.

For FedEx customers, this often results in an incremental change. The change for UPS customers could be more stark as a shipper’s spend levels diminish over time.

As the transportation environment continues to shift, it may make sense for some small package shippers to consider evaluating low-weight, multi-piece LTL shipments. Where warranted, transitioning those shipments to UPS Hundredweight or FedEx Multiweight can help drive revenue calculations.

If your company’s fluctuating parcel spend jeopardizes discount incentives, now is the time to have an honest conversation with account managers about the current situation, or consider exploring other carrier options. This can spur broader conversations that support improved cost management, including routing guides for outbound volume or billing practices that put cost control in your hands instead of your vendor partner.

Experienced parcel shippers can manage these program practices in-house. However, at a time when operational demands challenge many companies’ profitable performance, multi-modal transportation management experts using technology-enabled analysis can support parcel shipping optimization that enhances service and controls costs.

Parcel logistics leaders: Now more than ever it is important to make sure you get the best carrier rates possible. Companies pursuing peak fulfillment opportunities can leverage this non-standard peak season to their benefit while protecting customer experience.

Long-term Parcel Outlook

Don’t trust any crystal ball hype that you’re hearing in the marketplace. Nobody can predict what is happening tomorrow, next week or over the long-term. One thing is certain: there will be change.

This creates new opportunities to examine end-to-end organizational processes.

Digital transformation in recent years laid groundwork for the supply chain evolution many organizations are already embracing. Sourcing strategies, vendor locations and distribution network design are key elements in executives’ active conversations during this time of disruption. The prospect of financial incentives will drive more companies to diversify and reshore domestic production.

Transportation Insight manages supply chains for organizations of all sizes so they can focus on areas of their own expertise. Combining parcel invoice audit and payment, data management and analysis with decades of deep parcel industry experience, we help clients align their multi-modal transportation programs with carrier capabilities and customer demands.

In a dynamic, unpredictable marketplace, we’re here to lead you through efforts to adapt your current strategy, construct contingency plans for future disruptions and monitor your carriers performance. To make sure your small package shipping processes are delivering maximum value when it is needed most, schedule a parcel program assessment today.

What Do We Do with All These Returns? E-commerce and Reverse Logistics

That’s because consumers return goods bought online more often than they return in-store purchases. The Reverse Logistics Association reports that e-commerce return rates are three to four times higher than brick-and-mortar store rates. The volume you can expect varies according to product category, but plan on an average return rate of 25 to 35 percent.

Navigating reverse logistics requirements is new ground for most manufacturers that don’t experience processing and filling direct-to-consumer orders. It’s important to consider what’s involved and various process options, including outsourcing, before launching an e-commerce operation. 

Efficiency is Important to Both Brands and Shoppers

Returned goods must be inspected, re-packaged if necessary, and returned to inventory as quickly as possible so they can be purchased again. Getting returns back into inventory immediately is particularly important with popular items, merchandise with a short selling season, and during the intense holiday selling season. 

An effective reverse logistics process goes beyond getting sellable merchandise back into inventory quickly. It has an impact on brand loyalty, too. According to the Narvar Consumer Report 2018, customers are more likely to buy from you again if it’s easy to return merchandise. Of the nearly 70 percent of surveyed consumers who described their recent e-commerce return experience as easy or very easy, almost all – 96 percent – said they’d shop with that retailer again because of that ease. 

A successful reverse logistics process, then, needs to work for both the e-tailer and its customers. Consumers want an easy returns process; manufacturers want and need one that’s affordable and effective. 

Reverse Logistics Requirements

To meet these requirements, companies take into account:

  • Physical requirements: The reverse 
    logistics operation needs a  separate space dedicated to receiving, inspecting, and processing returns. 
  • Product inspection: Every returned item needs to be inspected by trained staff to determine next steps. 
  • Inspection outcomes: Inspectors make next-step decisions based on product condition and consumer demand. Options include returning it to inventory immediately, replacing the packaging, repairing or refurbishing, donating, and discarding.  

Manufacturers new to e-commerce often lack the expertise needed to manage these and other aspects of an efficient reverse logistics operation. Outsourcing the function to trusted partners allows brands to master the order fulfillment processes and identify trends and patterns in returns before deciding whether to bring reverse logistics in-house. 

Managing Reverse Logistics Costs

An experienced enterprise logistics provider can also positively impact on reverse logistics expenses. When working with an omni-channel accessories company to refine its online shopping and returns experience, Transportation Insight was able to help the company reduce its overall transportation spending by 21 percent. In addition, Transportation Insight’s solution helped the company marry parcel costs with actual product costs to determine net profit on every product shipped.

Brands continue to look for ways to reduce the number of returns and the associated transportation expenses. One major online apparel retailer is working to reduce the number of returns by doing more before the purchase to help consumers feel confident that they’re ordering the right size.

In situations involving heavy home products such as furniture and appliances, companies are getting creative. To reduce the number of deliveries rejected and returned because of damage, some manufacturers unbox and inspect the merchandise in regional fulfillment centers before home delivery. In other situations, delivery personnel are empowered to negotiate with the customer during delivery to resolve potential problems in a way that reduces the return rate. 

E-commerce businesses need more than a reverse logistics process – they need one that encourages consumers to continue to buy from them, gets goods returned as cost-effectively as possible, and restores merchandise to inventory quickly. 

Ready to learn how manufacturers can create an efficient and effective e-commerce program that includes reverse logistics? Download Transportation Insight’s e-commerce guide, “Start the Cart: A Manufacturer’s Guide to Achieving E-Commerce Fulfillment Excellence.”

Delivery Speed Drives E-Commerce Fulfillment Success

Today’s online shoppers certainly agree with the sentiment of Tom Cruise’s character in the 1986 movie “Top Gun.”

Thanks to the “Amazon effect,” consumers have a nearly insatiable appetite for speedy delivery. In fact, according to Elastic Path’s recent survey, 75 percent of consumers expect to enjoy same day delivery by early this year. 

Other than Amazon, Target, and Walmart – and even then, only in certain markets – most online retailers aren’t there yet. And consumer expectations probably won’t slow down any time either. That means Consumer Packaged Goods manufacturers venturing into e-commerce have no choice but accelerate their delivery performance. 

Overcoming the Transportation Cost Challenge

Consumer products manufacturers that aren’t yet immersed in e-commerce face numerous obstacles when striving to meet expectations for prompt delivery. The most obvious: companies that aren’t drop shipping online orders for retail clients already don’t have the systems, processes and procedures in place for piece order processing and fulfillment. 

Still, even the digitally native vertical brands built on an e-commerce model must address one of the biggest issues affecting online order fulfillment: high transportation costs. The “State of Logistics in 2019” report from Logistics Management notes that freight transportation costs comprise the biggest share of U.S. business logistics expenses. 

Companies struggle to reduce that expense. In fact, Inbound Logistics magazine’s 2019 “3PL Perspectives” report reveals that nearly two-thirds of shippers surveyed said that cutting transportation costs is their top challenge.

Location, location, location

For many, strategic location of the fulfillment center is a dual-purpose solution: It helps manage shipping costs while meeting consumer “need for speed.”  

E-commerce brands are seeking fulfillment options in carefully selected locations that can provide same- or next-day delivery where needed. Solutions include: 

  • Opening new fulfillment centers 
  • Acquiring businesses that are already doing it successfully
  • Contracting with experienced third-party or enterprise logistics providers 
  • Filling orders from brand-owned brick-and-mortar retail outlets

The latter option was just one solution a global, omni-channel retailer used when it partnered with our team to reduce its transportation budget. Leveraging brick-and-mortar stores as e-commerce fulfillment centers was one element of a multi-faceted strategy that cut transportation spending by 18 percent – $10 million – in just six months. 

Fulfillment Center Checklist

With each solution, consumer packaged goods manufacturers need to ask questions regarding each fulfillment center’s capabilities. The list of questions breaks down into three areas – location, facility suitability, and access to talent. 

Location

Key questions include:

  • Does the facility have adequate access to transportation and logistics partners? 
  • What market(s) can you serve from there? 
  • Most importantly, will you be able to meet customer delivery expectations from there affordably? 

Transportation Insight has a comprehensive network of warehousing and distribution partners with facilities throughout North America. We serve clients across the continent and overseas from our headquarters in Hickory, NC, and operating centers strategically located throughout the United States.

Talent

Access to the right workers can be as important as physical location. Among other things, you want to know:

  • Is there an available, trained workforce?
  • In markets where competition is tight for skilled workers, what processes do your partners have in place to attract and retain the right people?
  • In less-competitive markets, what training opportunities are available?

Facility suitability

How prepared the facility or partner is to being able to serve your customers has an impact on how quickly you’ll be able to start filling orders from there. Asking the right questions helps determine the best fit. They include:

  • If you need special handling such as cold storage, is it available or will you need to add it? 
  • Are there enough loading docks to handle bulk deliveries and parcel shipments? 
  • Do racking and materials handling processes in place already meet your direct-to-consumer order needs? 
  • Is the building wired for the technology you’ll use?

Success Formula

The final step is using data analytics and other resources to determine the right inventory mix in each location. 

With the right combination of resources, fulfillment center locations, and inventory management, consumer packaged goods manufacturers can serve shoppers in population-dense markets just as quickly as the big box retailers can. 

Ready to learn how manufacturers can evolve an effective e-commerce program? Download Transportation Insight’s guide, “Start the Cart: A Manufacturer’s Guide to Achieving E-Commerce Fulfillment Excellence.”

Reverse Logistics: Charting a Course to Protect Profit

But in the real world, errors can happen without warning. From human errors in picking orders to wrong shipping labels applied to boxes, even the best logistics plans can face uncertainty. In fact, as more apparel shoppers buy various sizes and return what doesn’t fit, a perfectly processed shipment can still result in returned goods. That’s where the “Reverse Logistics” process comes in: returning items from the consumer back to the company with the goal of managing final disposition. 

Does your company have a solid reverse logistics plan? As customers demand more flexibility, it’s important now more than ever to consider how reverse logistics fit into your overall strategy.  

What is Reverse Logistics?


The term “reverse logistics” was first coined in a 1992 whitepaper written by James R. Stock, Ph.D., a professor at the University of South Florida, and published by the Council of Logistics Management (now known as the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals). In scholarly terms, reverse logistics is defined as: “the process of moving goods from their typical final destination for the purpose of capturing value, or proper disposal.”

Five years later, a Dutch research team would delve further into that category with their own paper, published in the European Journal of Operational Research. Titled “Quantitative models for reverse logistics: A review,” the team acknowledged the “recently emerged field of reverse logistics” was a new area of study, and “…the time seems right for a systematic overview of the issues arising in the context of reverse logistics.” 

As computing advanced, the study of reverse logistics changed from an operational and mathematical field to a technology-driven field. Dr. Stock revisited the topic in a 2002 article published in Harvard Business Review, writing: “There are many reasons for this trend—the rise of electronic retailing, the increase in catalog purchases, more self-service in stores, lower tolerance among buyers for imperfection—but few companies are doing the best job of dealing with it.” He also noted several companies that were handling reverse logistics well at the time, including General Motors and Volvo.

In short: Every business that ships goods from warehouse to the customer needs a reverse logistics plan. And with technology touching every aspect of our lives, a traditional approach may not be enough to keep customers happy. 

The Problem With Standard Strategy

Traditionally, the reverse logistics plan always began with a human touch. After receiving a damaged or incorrect parcel, the customer called a toll-free number and requested permission to return their product. If approved, a return merchandise authorization was issued, and the customer was free to return their product via the preferred shipping method. The returned product  then took a long journey from customer to distribution center to returns center where the product’s ultimate fate was determined. 

Technology has made this model entirely outdated. First, utilizing traditional methods can add unnecessary shipping costs, making a return even more expensive than a lost refund. In addition, going through each of these steps adds a manpower cost – one which requires paying a salary and a share of benefits. 

While these steps were necessary in a pre-Internet world, technology has rendered much of this process obsolete. The problem is that despite the leaps that provide a much more customer-focused approach, some companies are still doing things the old-fashioned way – and quietly losing money as a result. 

The Benefits Re-Focusing the Reverse Logistics Strategy

Today’s reverse logistics doesn’t require a staff of hundreds of people processing  returns from around the world to determine their final disposition. Instead, a re-focus of reverse logistics can save a company time, manpower and realize a reduction in shipping costs. 

By utilizing a technology-focused approach to reverse logistics, the returns process doesn’t start with a call center and toll-free number, but with an automated form leading a consumer down a guided path. The right forms can lead users down a focused course of action that has more accuracy than a voice call and that effectively pre-sorts items before they are inspected for disposition. 

Through this pre-screening process, companies can significantly save on shipping costs. Once the technology determines where the item is destined, a return merchandise authorization form and shipping label with the most cost-effective means possible is automatically produced. This sends the item to the appropriate return center, where a quick inspection can confirm the item condition and bundle it with other items on an LTL load. Utilizing technology, the company reduces the amount of trucks required for shipping, resulting in actualized savings. 

Finally, a process that once involved several steps and weeks becomes a streamlined solution. Technology-enabled management of the intake process frees your workforce to focus on value-driven tasks, giving you optimal productivity from your team. 

The Downside of an Advanced Strategy

Of course, there are still challenges that can emerge in a holistic reverse logistics strategy. While technology is a great customer service enabler, it downsides can emerge as well. 

For example: a 22-year-old Spanish citizen was arrested in August 2019 on suspicion of returning boxes filled with dirt to a major online retailer. Instead of returning items, the scam artist weighed each box with items inside, and filled them to the same weight with dirt. He was accused of taking over $370,000 in fraudulent returns from the company. 

In this situation, the reverse logistics plan experienced an unforeseen issue. Automated inspection prior to disposition resulted in widespread fraud and benefit abuse. This is where the power of a trusted third-party logistics provider (3PL) comes in: through deep analysis of costs, benefits, gains and weaknesses, you can build an advanced reverse logistics strategy that will pass many common tests. 

How To Get Your Company Ready For Advanced Reverse Logistics 

If your reverse logistics process could benefit from a technology boost, it might be time to get a parcel program assessment from the leader in 3PL management: Transportation Insight. As your partner in transportation management, we can help you start preparing or fine-tuning a reverse logistics plan that utilizes technology to give you the competitive edge. Contact us today and get started on a strategy that prepares you for the future.