You Ramped Up E-Commerce Shipping for COVID…Now What?

The effort didn’t go unnoticed. 

Comparing year-over-year e-commerce sales, DigitalCommerce360 says volume was up 76% in June. And while that increase leveled off at 55% for July 2020, e-commerce sales are still up 55% year-over-year for the first seven months of the year. 

Retailers are driving much of that growth as many completely changed their distribution models (either permanently or temporarily) away from brick-and-mortar and over to alternative online fulfillment strategies. Already underway pre-pandemic, the movement to sell more online accelerated rapidly once B2B and B2C customers started placing more orders from their laptops and mobile devices. 

Reacting quickly to an event that hit fast, hard and unexpectedly, companies made e-commerce shipping decisions based on a desperate need to stay in business. As a result, those decisions do not always include a complete analysis of the true cost of shipping those goods to customers. As added costs emerge, including peak parcel surcharges from UPS and FedEx, the true cost picture becomes blurry. 

It’s time for a thorough assessment of exactly what your COVID-related e-commerce strategy is costing your company.

Take a Step Back, Assess E-Commerce Costs

As you continue to hone your business model to accommodate e-commerce growth and changing customer demands, it is time to take a step back and truly assess the costs associated with these models. 

Many of these companies will continue handling more e-commerce volume than they did pre-COVID (even with their physical stores opening again). Managing both sides of the equation profitably requires a thorough investigation of the true cost of shipping and a strategy that factors in customers’ needs with organizational profitability. 

Companies should also weed out their “losing” SKUs, assess shipping costs right down to the package level, practice good margin management across the entire organization, utilize data for good decision-making, and work with a reputable logistics partner. 

Master E-Commerce Shipping, Master Order Profitability

Continue shipping products without closely examining the time, effort and money that goes into sending out each package and you will soon find yourself underwater. As pandemic pushed e-commerce sales and residential orders to new heights, was your organization among those that raced into reactive mode?

Do you know the true cost of your e-commerce shipping decisions? You can not afford to ignore this problem.

To help you master your response to online demand, our Supply Chain Masters created “You Shipped It, but … Did It Make Money?” Read today and access strategies to protect profitability for every order and every customer.

Blockchain in Supply Chain: Can You Trust Your Data Sharing Partners?

Not everything is changing.

When it comes to the blockchain, artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies we’ll increasingly implement in go-forward supply chain practices, we’ll still rely on the same essential element: trust.

Now more than ever, to benefit from these technologies, all parties in the supply chain will be required to share data at an unprecedented level. Possibilities for improved efficiencies, real-time visibility, data security, vendor compliance and other benefits will flow from shared data streams.

Yet many companies are culturally uncomfortable with the depth of transparency that will be required. Those organizations that do not participate will find themselves increasingly isolated from the economic mainstream.

Certainly, organizations should exercise due diligence in understanding the partners who will access their information and how it will be used. Organizations don’t have to share with every vendor or service provider that requests access. But enterprises must prepare for the new world of shared data with policies and procedures for these technologies emerging in the supply chain environment.

Do you have concerns about sharing data with your supply chain partners? If so, do you know why?

Blockchain Builds on Trust

Technologies like blockchain create a new “trust economy” where the old intermediaries are replaced by new systems. As blockchain and artificial intelligence enter day-to-day use, sharing data with third parties and vendors will be necessary. The system creates security through technology rather than relying on familiar relationships of the past.

To be useful, your organization’s data must be validated to ensure it is accurate and complete. Information stored in the blockchain isn’t valuable if it’s wrong.

Blockchain, in particular, is developing as a safe, customizable standard to share data in a way that protects proprietary information while providing value from the openly available information. For example, companies can manage supply chain vendor compliance issues without revealing specifics about their supply chain.

As the use of blockchain moves forward, it will be critical to strike a balance between transparency and confidentiality for all stakeholders as they adopt the technology to record and share supply chain data. With well-thought-out restrictions, a company could use the blockchain for internal purposes and share only the necessary data with other stakeholders.

Sharing data makes the most sense when it’s part of a strategy to improve processes or connect with partners in the supply chain. Blockchain information will drive tactical and strategic decisions that support predictive analytics and demand forecasting. Companies fear losing control of their data for any number of reasons, from baring their operations to competitors to sharing accurate costs with vendors. Some internal organizations see data management as their base of power and are reluctant to be open to external engagements.

Validate Captured Data to Maximize Technology Capabilities

Most organizations don’t have the internal capabilities to support endeavors focused on utilizing emerging technology applications like blockchain. An Enterprise Logistics Provider with deep analytical experience can help you identify and focus on the actionable information that you already capture on a regular basis.

With a trusted partner, your organization can manage its data-sharing strategies to share only what’s required and maintain control of your information, while connecting with the benefits of blockchain.

To find out more about why and how you should share your organization’s data, read our resource guide: AI, Blockchain, Machine Learning: Is Your Data Ready?