6 Qualities to Look for in an E-Commerce Logistics Partner

With changing customer demands, new carrier surcharges, COVID, and other challenges taking a bite out of shippers’ bottom lines right now, those companies are best served by logistics partners that bring a high level of value to the table. Even better, they do this while helping shippers overcome their key pain points and achieve their organizational goals.

If your e-commerce logistics provider isn’t living up to expectations in these six areas, it may be time to find one that will.

  1. Technology Systems that Mirror the Carriers’ Own Systems
    This allows the provider to estimate cost impact and predictive modeling to the penny. Every time the carriers make a change, that change should also be made in your provider’s system.
  2. A Strong Team of Subject Matter Experts
    That team should include engineers and analysts that know how to leverage the carriers’ profitability areas to gain better advantages for you (versus what a traditional account rep can manage). Our experts regularly share their insight with the marketplace.

  1. Ongoing Analysis and Strategic “Thinkery”
    Look for a partner that thinks well beyond the “one and done” approach. Today’s business environment requires a partner that focuses on continued delivery optimization and cost mitigation.
  2. A Proactive Auditing Function
    Rather than relying on a reactive mindset (e.g., asking for the same refunds over and over again), your provider should be working with an “identify and repair” mindset to eliminate these potential issues and mitigate ongoing costs.
  3. Advanced Analytics and KPI Tracking
    As e-commerce continues to grow, you need a partner that is constantly innovating and adding functionalities like margin management, SKU-level profitability, KPI tracking, order performance management and high levels of supply chain visibility.   
  4. A Problem-solving Mindset
    When new accessorials or surcharges are released, your logistics provider should be measuring the impacts of those changes on your budget and helping you mitigate those impacts.

Master Your E-Commerce Supply Chain

Possessing these key qualities, we bring our client partners ongoing value as they race to meet demands for delivery speed, service and choice. Supporting your efforts to enhance customer experience, we also implement strategies to control costs so that you can maintain awareness of how each and every product and customer is performing. 

Our Parcel Experts created “You Shipped It, but … Did it Make Money?” to identify some of the emerging challenges that jeopardize your profit. It highlights our approach in the marketplace and gives you a glimpse into the level of analysis that we bring our customers. 

Let’s take a deeper look at the supply chain challenges you are experiencing. Reach out to our supply chain masters today to begin a conversation about your personalized solution.

Cost Changes Hide in Shift to Online Fulfillment

By expediting moves toward ship-from-store, buy-online-pickup-in-store (BOPIS) and other alternative fulfillment options, those retailers seized a growth opportunity in a slow economy. At the same time, they continued to move inventory, employ associates, and effectively utilize brick-and-mortar assets all while delighting customers.

However, in the rush to make those changes and meet consumer demand, it is not enough to have resources capable of adapting and executing your supply chain network strategy. It is essential that those resources provide a clear understanding of how alternative services affect costs across your transportation network.

While offering service alternatives to a demanding consumer base can drive revenue growth, profit margins can quickly disappear without awareness to how those new delivery options can affect freight cost, time-in-transit and carrier utilization, among other key transportation performance metrics.

We help our retail clients recognize the financial implications of their service changes with a transportation alignment study that helps them quickly redesign their network strategy, execute on transportation procurement and access the evidence required for decision-making that protects profitable performance.

Evolving Fulfillment Strategy to Meet Online Demand

When the pandemic began affecting U.S. retailers, many of our clients with distribution centers faced the risk of closure due to “Stay at Home, Work Safe” guidelines issued by federal and local agencies. At the same time, revenue was stagnant for retailers with brick-and-mortar storefronts that were required to close due to social distancing expectations.

With online sales booming, some of our retail clients took brave action to convert darkened stores into mini-fulfillment centers. Deploying staff from distribution centers and stores to complete fulfillment activity at the retail locations, these clients are not only able to keep staff gainfully employed, they are also utilizing store inventory that might have otherwise gone unsold.

Making this type of move with your fulfillment strategy can happen quickly – scenarios within 10 days have been reported for some retailers. Adding BOPIS with curbside capabilities can happen in 60 days. These types of changes have become a necessity for retailers across the country, but by changing fulfillment models, these organizations also completely changed their supply chain and distribution network. Unfortunately, because this adaptation occurred so quickly and with such a need to continue business, it is not always supported by the essential transportation study and analysis that determines the cost implications of the network changes.

Do you have the systems in place to determine how these changes affect freight cost, profit margin and customer experience?

Leveraging Data, Analysis to Manage Cost of Online Fulfillment

As our retail clients are rapidly responding to the changes the pandemic is driving in consumer behaviors, we use technology tools and industry expertise to support network alignment studies that clarify cost implications of service changes.

Using historical shipping data, analysis and multi-modal expertise, we help clients manage cost/identify opportunity by providing greater visibility to:

  • Impact of network changes to overall transportation cost
  • Time in transit through predictive modeling based on carrier zone information
  • Freight expense as percentage of cost to serve
  • Margin impact by product level
  • Consumer geography and accessorial changes
  • Overlapping shipment details
  • Store-level profitability
  • Split-order percentage trends
  • “True” customer experience metrics
  • Consumer behavior analysis

With the results of our network alignment/margin management study, we help our retail clients make changes to their carrier contracts, their carrier utilization or their market response. In doing so, we’re able to help make sure they are fulfilling orders in a profitable way, while protecting customer experience.

Master Online Fulfillment

Organizations that create a supply chain personalized to the expectations and behaviors of their customers can achieve greater brand loyalty and improve customer retention. At the same time, the shippers that establish a nimble network can rapidly respond to fluctuations in supply and demand and capitalize on opportunities for growth.

If your business is pursuing rapid deployment of alternative fulfillment practices, make sure you understand fulfillment costs at the retail store location. Retailers that can manage network costs associated with a strategy adjustment in order fulfillment can realize competitive advantage. That’s especially meaningful in a tumultuous environment where rapid supply chain pivots are required to capitalize on changes in consumer behavior.

As a supply chain master, we’ve worked with hundreds of organizations mapping thousands of supply chains. Applying expertise across diverse retail categories and industry segments, multi-modal transportation management capabilities and technology-enabled data management and analysis, we help clients align their transportation practices with their business goals.

To master your online order fulfillment and deploy a variety of final delivery options talk to one of our experts today.

Improve E-Commerce Experience Without Sacrificing Profitability

With Amazon commanding 47% of U.S. e-commerce sales and on track to grow its online sales by 20.4% to $282.52 billion, pursuing this formidable opponent makes sense to a lot of companies. Unfortunately, many of them are sacrificing profits in their attempt to compete, with transportation and fulfillment costs consuming a large part of their budgets.

Opportunity or Liability?

In many cases, the risks of racing Amazon have literally turned into liabilities, effectively slowing progress and forcing companies to rethink everything from their online order interfaces, shopping cart conversions, and final-mile/same-day order fulfillment management.

The brick and mortar world has really ramped up its game, but Amazon has conditioned us, as end consumers, that those efforts just are not good enough.

4 Practices to Protect Profitability

The good news is that there are steps that companies can take to improve e-commerce strategies without sacrificing profitability. Here are four that your company can start using today: 

  1. Develop an above-par order fulfillment strategy. Amazon built its order fulfillment strategy around offering choices to its customers. In doing so, it made the online shopping experience all about the customer and his/her decisions. The e-tailer provides high levels of supply chain visibility as shipments move from Point A to Point B, maintains good inventory control, and understands its cost to serve. One good metric to use, when judging the efficiency of your order fulfillment processes, is the “Perfect Order,” or one that is on time, complete, intact, and includes the right shipping paperwork. In an environment where order fulfillment can comprise over 60% of the typical warehouse’s total direct labor, even small gains in this area can lead to profitability improvements
  1. Now, deliver on that strategy (on every order). Not only does shipping have to be free and fast, but if it includes a hovercraft and a promise to get a package to your doorstep within an hour, then all the better. We’re at a point where anything less simply doesn’t meet customer expectations. There’s little (if any) room for error on this step. Retailers that want to convert digital consumers know that competing on price and customer experience just isn’t enough anymore; they have to also be able to compete on speed and choice. Handled improperly, same-day delivery can be a logistical nightmare and major risk for retailers. It’s also a necessary evil for them, and something that they all have to be able to do for at least some of their customers. Making that happen requires locations and/or warehouses positioned close to those buyers; a modification of existing fulfillment procedures; a smart, profitable BOPIS strategy; and ensuring that the right product is in the right place and at precisely the right minute.

  1. Focus on continuous monitoring and improvement. Companies can no longer wait until quarterly review meetings to uncover a problem that happened a month ago. Smart companies use daily scorecards to gather, compare and disseminate meaningful, actionable intelligence (e.g., what products were shipped? How quickly were orders fulfilled? Did we pick all of our orders yesterday? If no, how can we make that up today?). By taking an introspective look at their e-commerce operations and developing metrics based on those results, retailers can adapt faster in a world that demands speed, accuracy and delivery on promises. 
  2. Make the right transportation choices. If your company can’t access data that provides strategy around carrier contract alignment and then facilitates choosing the most economical transportation mode, it’s probably losing money. And, if it’s channeling all of its resources into getting same-day and next-day shipments out the door as quickly as possible − without worrying about whether or not those are the best and most economical decisions − it’s losing even more money. These are huge risks in an era where companies are being forced to go head-to-head with Amazon and Walmart, both of which offer same-day and one-day delivery to 72% and 75% of the total U.S. population, respectively. Retailers should be using technology (i.e., transportation management systems or TMS) to select not only the most economical mode, but also one that meets customers’ delivery expectations. Leveraging transactional audit across all modes, provides companies consolidated, visibility to know the rate they paid, identify service gaps, and improve their ability to make good transportation decisions going forward.

Following these guidelines, companies can effectively improve the e-commerce experience without sacrificing profitability − all while satisfying a lot of happy, repeat customers.

Ready to learn more ways retailers can improve e-commerce performance to satisfy customer demands for service and choice? Download Transportation Insight’s e-commerce guide.

5 Ways to Build an E-Commerce Engine that Wins

Facing stiff competition from web-based suppliers, e-commerce providers and even traditional companies, retailers must enhance the customer experience by offering variety in delivery options − and all without impacting the cost to the consumer.

In most cases, achieving this balance starts with a modern e-commerce engine that’s supported by a robust transportation and fulfillment approach.

Best Practices Achieve Competitive Advantage

Here are five critical steps for developing an e-commerce transportation and fulfillment plan that goes head-to-head with the e-tailing giants. 

  1. Make your website user friendly. This sounds elemental enough in theory, but in reality, very few companies are doing it. Success in e-commerce starts with a user-friendly interface that doesn’t frustrate customers or send them off to buy from another site. If your online store’s ordering system is cumbersome and difficult to use, no one is going to use it unless they have to. And mobile friendly is vital.
  2. Drive up online checkout rates. The retailer that isn’t boosting online checkout rates will quickly find itself struggling to survive in a sea of companies that have figured out the formula. If you ignore the need to drive down abandonment rates, all of the advertising, marketing and sales efforts in the world won’t help you compete against the likes of Amazon and other large e-tailers. Measure key performance indicators (KPIs) like page views to cart conversions in order to get a gauge on 1) current state, and 2) what you can do to drive those numbers up.
  3. Develop a same-day order fulfillment strategy. Handled improperly, same-day delivery can be a logistical nightmare and major risk for retailers. Although becoming a necessary evil that all retailers must do for at least some of their customers, making that happen requires locations and/or warehouses positioned close to those buyers; a modification of existing fulfillment procedures; and ensuring that the right product is in the right place and at precisely the right minute. Aligning BOPIS strategies with profitability is significantly important when developing same-day order fulfillment.

  1. Factor in parcel, heavy home, and customized deliveries. When it comes to bulky goods that require extra muscle and/or assembly, retailers need to factor in three different scenarios: leaving the box in the entryway of a home or apartment; placing it in the room of choice; or both, plus opening up the box, removing the packaging, and setting up the product(s). Retailers must deliver on some, or all of these, expectations for the end consumer, who is typically willing to pay for those additional services.
  2. Select the best and most economical transportation mode. Retailers don’t always have access to the data that allows them to utilize economical mode selection. Instead, they focus only on getting same-day and next-day shipments out the door as quickly as possible (without worrying about whether or not those are the best and most economical decisions). Retailers should be leveraging carrier contract agreements that align with package characteristics/shipping networks. They should also use technology (i.e., transportation management systems or TMS) to select not only the mode that is most economical and provides tracking visibility, but one that also meets customers’ delivery expectations.

By keeping customers at the center of the conversation, providing visibility to shipments, working to fulfill their needs on every order quickly, and developing a transportation plan that aligns with these goals, smart companies can position themselves as suppliers of choice in today’s competitive e-commerce world. 

Ready to learn more ways retailers can improve e-commerce performance to satisfy customer demands for service and choice? Download Transportation Insight’s e-commerce guide, Managing the Risk of Racing Amazon.

5 Red Flags for Retailers Racing Amazon

In an era where delivery choice and speed are becoming fundamental expectations for everyone, companies across most industries are rethinking how they receive, fulfill, and ship customer orders. Facing stiff competition from web-based suppliers, e-commerce providers, and even traditional companies, retailers, distributors, and manufacturers alike are challenged to enhance customer experience by offering variety in delivery options – without impacting the cost to the consumer.

Getting there isn’t easy.

Risks consistently stand in the way of retailers that want and need to deliver the best possible e-commerce experiences for their customers.

Driving Digital Growth and Retail Response

In its 2019 Retail Industry Outlook: Navigating disruption in retail report, Deloitte paints a picture of an industry where the consumer is unquestionably in the driver’s seat. “Consumers realize they can have it all. Today’s digital consumers are increasingly connected, have more access to information, and expect businesses to react to all their needs and wants instantly.”

Operating in an industry that’s in a state of constant disruption, retailers are managing through uncertain times and placing bets on what will separate the winners from the losers. “Those that can synchronize their investments to profitably empower the consumer will likely find themselves on the right side of the tipping point,” Deloitte concludes.

The good news is that the retail industry continues to thrive, with U.S. retail sales expected to rise between 3.8% and 4.4% to more than $3.8 trillion in 2019, according to the National Retail Federation (NRF), which credits high consumer confidence, low unemployment, and rising wages for driving these numbers up. The 2019 holiday season should be particularly bright, with Coresight anticipating a 3.5%-4.0% year-over-year increase in U.S. retail sales during November and December.

These positive outlooks present a viable opportunity for retailers that learn how to harness e-commerce and use it to their advantage. For many retailers, getting a piece of that pie will require a good, hard look at the red flags that are slowing down their e-commerce service and putting them out of the running for today’s “want it now” consumer. 

Red Flags that Slow the E-Commerce Profit Race

Here are five risks that consistently stand in the way of retailers that want and need to deliver the best possible e-commerce experiences for their customers: 

Risk #1:  Web-based order interfaces. Success in e-commerce starts with a user-friendly interface that doesn’t frustrate customers or send them off to buy from another site. Put simply, if your online store’s ordering system is cumbersome and difficult to use, no one is going to use it unless they have to.  

Risk #2:  Shopping cart conversions. The retailer that isn’t boosting online checkout rates will quickly find itself struggling to survive in a sea of companies that have figured out the formula. Ignore the need to drive down abandonment rates and all of the advertising, marketing, and sales efforts in the world won’t help you compete against the likes of Amazon and other large e-tailers.   

Risk #3: Same-day order fulfillment. Retailers that want to convert digital consumers know that competing on price and customer experience just isn’t enough anymore; they have to also be able to compete on speed. Handled improperly, same-day delivery can be a logistical nightmare and major risk for retailers. It’s also a necessary evil for them, and something that they all have to be able to do for at least some of their customers.     

Risk #4:  Parcel, heavy home, and customized delivery platforms. When it comes to bulky goods that require extra muscle and/or assembly, retailers need to factor in three different scenarios: leaving the box in the entryway of a home or apartment; putting it in the room of choice; or doing both of these plus opening up the box, removing the packaging, and setting up the product(s). With delivery on demand becoming increasingly prevalent, giving the customer scheduling control and providing reliable service further enhances customer experience.

Risk #5:  Selecting the best, most economical transportation mode. Often retailers don’t have access to the data that allows them to utilize more economical mode selection. Instead, many focus solely on getting same-day and next-day shipments out the door as quickly as possible without worrying about whether or not those are the best and most economical decisions. This is a huge risk in an era where companies are being forced to go head-to-head with Amazon and Walmart, both of which offer same-day and one-day delivery to 72%-75% of the total U.S. population, respectively.   

The retailer that understands the transportation risks that exist in the race against Amazon are positioned to proactively mitigate them in today’s disruptive selling environment. These organizations will be best positioned to not only maintain market share, but to also prepare itself for what’s coming around the next corner. 

Ready to learn more about the risks facing retailers on the e-commerce front and how to solve them? Download Transportation Insight’s e-commerce guide, Managing the Risk of Racing Amazon.